Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Chiefly British Variant of valor.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Value; worth.
  • n. Strength of mind in regard to danger; that quality which enables a person to encounter danger with firmness; personal bravery; courage; prowess; intrepidity.
  • n. A brave man; a man of valor.
  • n. arrogance

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the qualities of a hero or heroine; exceptional or heroic courage when facing danger (especially in battle)

Etymologies

Anglo-Norman valour < continental Old French valor, from Latin valor. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This may merely reflect a heightened sense, that regarding prosecution under UCMJ Article 125, as Falstaff observed, “The better part of valour is discretion”.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » “Four Days That Shook DADT”

  • John Herbison: This may merely reflect a heightened sense, that regarding prosecution under UCMJ Article 125, as Falstaff observed, “The better part of valour is discretion”.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » “Four Days That Shook DADT”

  • Moreover, he hath seven daughters, who in valour and prowess equal and even excel their sisters,66 and he hath made the eldest of them, the damsel whom thou sawest,67 queen over the country aforesaid and who is the wisest of her sisters and in valour and horsemanship and craft and skill and magic excels all the folk of her dominions.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The better part of valour is discretion; in the which better part I have saved my life. '

    On the nightstand (under the pillow, in the knapsack, etc.)

  • Canada is His Excellency General Georges Vanier, full of years, clothed in valour, replete with kindness and dignity and learning, and full of compassion for all mankind.

    The Unsinkable Commonwealth

  • The reasons upon which my opinion was grounded were these: The Count was courageous in the highest degree of what is commonly called valour, and had a more than ordinary share in that boldness of mind which we call resolution.

    Court Memoirs of France Series — Complete

  • And British valour is renowned, from Ind to Lapland's shore:

    Colin's Return to Sea

  • Their valour is no better than that of a barking cur, who affrights all that go on without looking at him, but who, the moment he is turned upon with a stamp and a fierce look, retreats himself, amazed, afraid, and ashamed. '

    Camilla: or, A Picture of Youth

  • The intrepidity of your worship’s valour is sufficiently vouched: I apprehend the bravery of no combatant needs do more than challenge his adversary, and await him in the field; and, if the enemy wont meet him, the imputation of cowardice lies with him, and the crown of victory devolves upon the other.

    A Review of 'Alroy'

  • Endued he was with heroycall valour, compleate in all perfections of person, and his minde every way answerable to his outward behaviour, exceeding Gianetta about sixe yeeres in age.

    The Decameron

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