Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Women considered as a group.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Women, taken collectively.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The females of the human race; women, collectively.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Women in general; the female sex; the females collectively of the human kind.
  • n. A body of women, especially in a household; the female members of a family.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. women as distinguished from men

Etymologies

From woman +‎ -kind. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • For a man who cannot command his womankind is a fool. '

    A Hyperborean Brew

  • His modesty at the mention of womankind is notable.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • I am a man who can now have no joy in womankind, but when as a brother I protect them.

    The Scottish Chiefs

  • And I promise you that, at this moment, if there be pillows sleepless yonder in the camp for the sake of the costly fragile toys called womankind, those jackasses of lovelorn lads have cause to regret the sojourn of Queen Margaret in

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844

  • Men, especially lovers, are addicted to the innocent fatuity of preferring to protect weakness rather than to admire courage in womankind.

    Indiana

  • He had not only lost his love, but what is more precious than love – faith in womankind.

    John Halifax, Gentleman

  • ` ` Ah, poor fellow! nothing can be more melancholy; unless, as young men sometimes do, you had fancied yourself in love with some trumpery specimen of womankind, which is indeed, as Shakspeare truly says, pressing to death, whipping, and hanging all at once. ''

    The Antiquary

  • "Ah, poor fellow! nothing can be more melancholy; unless, as young men sometimes do, you had fancied yourself in love with some trumpery specimen of womankind, which is indeed, as Shakspeare truly says, pressing to death, whipping, and hanging all at once."

    The Antiquary — Complete

  • “Ah, poor fellow! nothing can be more melancholy; unless, as young men sometimes do, you had fancied yourself in love with some trumpery specimen of womankind, which is indeed, as Shakspeare truly says, pressing to death, whipping, and hanging all at once.”

    The Antiquary

  • Oh, one other thing: Perhaps you can forbid your students to say anything other than "womankind" or "you gals" while they are in your class.

    The Pain, the pain

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