beautifulpyre has looked up 0 words, created 3 lists, listed 53 words, written 31 comments, added 1 tag, and loved 242 words.

Comments by beautifulpyre

  • Cascadian Tree Octopus

    April 30, 2009

  • Begins March 16.

    April 30, 2009

  • I thought it was a rabbit nest. I'm thinking of Watership Down.

    April 30, 2009

  • That's a moray!

    April 30, 2009

  • Monarda! Grows wild in the hills of West Virginia. Smells wonderful.

    April 30, 2009

  • Gag.

    April 30, 2009

  • Almost shadow.

    April 30, 2009

  • Rhymes with giraffe.

    April 30, 2009

  • The only word in the English language that rhymes with orange.

    April 30, 2009

  • The face veil on its own is called a niqab.

    April 30, 2009

  • I lol. :D

    April 30, 2009

  • Also called a hollow or holler!

    April 30, 2009

  • Attar of Roses

    April 30, 2009

  • See also: peradventure.

    April 30, 2009

  • European version of the craft project known in America as gimp, boondoggle or making a lanyard. Pronounced like the cartoon character's name, Scooby Doo.

    April 30, 2009

  • A nepenthe is said to be a potion that soothes by causing a person to forget bad memories.

    I first came across it as the name of the main character in The Alphabet of Thorn by Patricia A. McKillip (love her!).

    April 30, 2009

  • NO.

    April 30, 2009

  • A kind of aquatic moss.

    April 30, 2009

  • From The Aberdeen Bestiary Project: 'Parander' seems to be an archaic word for fox.

    April 30, 2009

  • Seems to be the name of a kind of coral. This would fit with the context from The Name of the Rose since Adso was describing a carved door that contained many creatures one would find in an obscure bestiary.

    See also: hydrophore.

    The line from The Name of the Rose is "hydrophora with sawtooth horns".

    April 30, 2009

  • See dragopods.

    April 30, 2009

  • From Wikipedia: "The condition of having the head of a dog or jackal".

    See also: cynocephalus.

    April 30, 2009

  • Taking a messy stab here, drago: dragon, pod: feet. Creatures with dragonlike feet or dragons for feet.

    April 30, 2009

  • From the Latin, "dog-head".

    See cynocephaly.

    April 30, 2009

  • From Wikipedia: "The condition of having the head of a dog or jackal."

    See also: cynophales.

    April 30, 2009

  • From what I can piece together, this means something like "dog-penis." (Cyno: dog, phales: phallus?)

    The usage from the Name of the Rose (in which Adso is describing a carved door with all kinds of obscure creatures from a bestiary) suggests it might be a doglike creature with a prominent phallus.

    The line from The Name of the Rose is "cynophales who darted fire from their nostrils."

    See also: cynocephaly. Could cynophales simply be a shortening of cynocephalus?

    April 30, 2009

  • Many-tailed. Related: bicaudal.

    April 30, 2009

  • Two-tailed. Related: polycaudal.

    April 30, 2009

  • From The Free Dictionary: "Pliny said that the offspring of a crocotta and a lion was the leucrota (or leucrocuta, leucrocotta, or leocrocotta), which could imitate the sound of a human voice. This was no doubt the source of the later, similar claims for the abilities of the crocotta itself. The leucrota was said to be a cloven hooved animal the size of a male donkey, yet swift and fierce. Described as having the haunches of a stag; the tail, chest, and neck of a lion; and the head of a badger, its mouth was said to open back as far as its ears. Instead of teeth it had ridges of bone that could crush anything. It was said to never close its eyes and its backbone was said to be so rigid that it had to turn around to see what was behind it."

    "The dog-wolf crocotta and the antelope-like leucrota were clearly meant to be two different types of animals, but because of their alleged blood relation, the similarity of their names, and their supposed ability to speak with a human voice, the authors of bestiaries often mistook one for another. This is likely the source of many of the later conflations of their reputed characteristics."

    April 30, 2009

  • From The Free Dictionary: The offspring of a crocotta and lion was known as the Leucrota, a beast mentioned in The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

    April 30, 2009

  • Adj. Having many tails or tail-like appendages, a creature with many tails. (Caud: tail, poly: many) See also: polycaudal, bicaudal.

    The line from The Name of the Rose is "polycaudate, hairy serpents."

    April 30, 2009

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