Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To depart in a hurry; abscond.
  • intransitive verb To die.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To run away; abscond; make off.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb A jocular word. U. S. To take one's self off; to decamp.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb intransitive, slang to abscond.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Mock-Latinate formation (perhaps influenced by abscond) purporting to mean “to go off and squat elsewhere” : ab- + squat + -ulate (as in perambulate).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Blended jocular mock-Latin word. Probably made up of the following parts: Latin ab- ("away (from)"), (maybe taken from English abscond), English -ate (maybe taken from English perambulate, and the middle portion, "squatul", which might be a derivation of English squattle ("depart"), or squat.

Examples

  • The series I write, The Accidental Adventures, is considered good for "reluctant readers," meaning the books are fast reads, heavy on humor, and when I use a big word like absquatulate, I define it right away, usually in relation to passing gas it means to leave in a hurry.

    Charles London: There Are No Boy Books

  • The series I write, The Accidental Adventures, is considered good for "reluctant readers," meaning the books are fast reads, heavy on humor, and when I use a big word like absquatulate, I define it right away, usually in relation to passing gas it means to leave in a hurry.

    Charles London: There Are No Boy Books

  • The series I write, The Accidental Adventures, is considered good for "reluctant readers," meaning the books are fast reads, heavy on humor, and when I use a big word like absquatulate, I define it right away, usually in relation to passing gas it means to leave in a hurry.

    Charles London: There Are No Boy Books

  • The series I write, The Accidental Adventures, is considered good for "reluctant readers," meaning the books are fast reads, heavy on humor, and when I use a big word like absquatulate, I define it right away, usually in relation to passing gas it means to leave in a hurry.

    Charles London: There Are No Boy Books

  • The series I write, The Accidental Adventures, is considered good for "reluctant readers," meaning the books are fast reads, heavy on humor, and when I use a big word like absquatulate, I define it right away, usually in relation to passing gas it means to leave in a hurry.

    Charles London: There Are No Boy Books

  • The series I write, The Accidental Adventures, is considered good for "reluctant readers," meaning the books are fast reads, heavy on humor, and when I use a big word like absquatulate, I define it right away, usually in relation to passing gas it means to leave in a hurry.

    Charles London: There Are No Boy Books

  • Smart enough to be dumb enough, or dumb enough to be smart enough? absquatulate

    Think Progress » Anti-Semitism, U.N.-Bashing Color History of “War on Christmas” Conspiracy

  • Sam might have continued writing bright, frivolous pieces for Bret Harte and his bohemian paper indefinitely, had it not become propitious for him to absquatulate again.

    Mark Twain

  • Sam might have continued writing bright, frivolous pieces for Bret Harte and his bohemian paper indefinitely, had it not become propitious for him to absquatulate again.

    Mark Twain

  • Certain words used by George St. George are part of the backwoods culture of Davy Crockett, and come from the nineteenth century. absquatulate depart, run away exflunct exhaust, beat thoroughly obflisticated bewildered, confused ramsquaddle demolish ripstavera first-rate person or thing slantindicular in a slanting direction

    The Runaway Asteroid

Comments

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  • This is the funniest word I've heard in a long time... it almost matches booger in it's guffaw-factor.

    September 23, 2007

  • Now here's a tongue-twister:

    Sasquatch absquatulated squeamishly.

    December 3, 2007

  • This is a great word, it's so fun to say.

    December 3, 2007

  • I love this word. Actual, complete telephone conversation between myself and my nineteen-year-old (younger) sister, who was out for dinner, on Saturday night:

    Sister: Hi, um, you know that...what's that word from the other day that means "running away and taking another person with you"?

    A: ...Honey. You are NOT calling the house at 12:30 just to ask me the definition of a word.

    Sister: Yeah, I totally am. What's the word?

    A: pause It's 'absquatulate,' sweetheart.

    Sister: cracks up

    A: cracks up

    Sister: Okay okay okay. Bye!

    April 7, 2008

  • Oh my stars and garters... how have I lived for so long without knowing this wonderful, wonderful word?!!!

    April 8, 2008

  • Pterodactyl, I demand that you go list "oh my stars and garters" on my list of Delightful Ejaculations right now. Pretty please!

    April 8, 2008

  • No need to demand, c_b -- I'd be delighted to add to that excellent list. :-)

    April 8, 2008

  • Hee... now it's there, and I'm happy. :) *sighs*

    April 8, 2008

  • The term "absquatulate" has become familiar to us during the war. "It comes from a or ab, privative, and squat, western for settle. When a squatter removes, he absquatulates." In peculiar circumstances whole companies have absquatulated.

    (Forty years of American life, by Thomas Low Nichols)

    June 24, 2008

  • I think someone told me this word was made up by Mark Twain.

    June 24, 2008