Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of the alternative forms of a gene or other homologous DNA sequence.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun one of two or more alternative forms of a gene that can have the same place on homologous chromosomes and are responsible for alternative traits.
  • noun either of a pair of Mendelian characters that may occur in an organism as a consequence of variation at one gene locus.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun genetics One of a number of alternative forms of the same gene occupying a given position on a chromosome.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (genetics) either of a pair (or series) of alternative forms of a gene that can occupy the same locus on a particular chromosome and that control the same character

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[German Allel, short for Allelomorph, allelomorph, from English allelomorph.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From German Allel, shortened from Allelomorph, from English allelomorph.

Examples

  • Evolution is about one thing: The explanation for the changes in allele frequencies over time.

    Pious Atheism « Anglican Samizdat

  • The allele could originate by mutation of an allele for brown fur and the environment caused selection which caused a change in allele frequency.

    Chunkdz Comes Out Smokin

  • The allele could originate by mutation of an allele for brown fur and the environment caused selection which caused a change in allele frequency.

    Chunkdz Comes Out Smokin

  • The mechanisms whereby genomes are reduced or expanded are often not the standard "neo-Darwinian processes", ie changes in allele frequency.

    A Dubious "Opportunity" for IDers

  • The mechanisms whereby genomes are reduced or expanded are often not the standard "neo-Darwinian processes", ie changes in allele frequency.

    A Dubious "Opportunity" for IDers

  • Mesk, when you suggest that an allele is conserved if it has 0. 0001% advantage, you are comparing apples to oranges in this case, are you not?

    Demarcation as Politics

  • Mesk, when you suggest that an allele is conserved if it has 0. 0001% advantage, you are comparing apples to oranges in this case, are you not?

    Demarcation as Politics

  • If you did it with 5,000 mutants and 5,000 wild-types (enough to detect a selective advantage as small as 0.005%) and saw changes in allele frequency compatible with drift, people would definitely stand up and take notice.

    Demarcation as Politics

  • With interesting applications here for diagnosis, therapy models and possibly even pharmaceuticals, the authors concluded that "the absence of this protective bias in short-allele carriers is likely to be linked with the heightened susceptibility to mood disorders such as depression and anxiety that has been reported in this group."

    MaRS Blog - Innovation and Commercialization in Canada

  • (An allele is any of the variants of a gene that takes more than one form; such genes are known as polymorphisms.

    The Science of Success

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • allele:

    The different forms of a given gene that an organism may possess. For example, in humans, one allele of the eye-color gene produces green eyes and another allele of the eye-color gene produces brown eyes.

    September 27, 2008