Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Greek & Roman Mythology The food of the gods, thought to confer immortality.
  • noun Something with an especially delicious flavor or fragrance.
  • noun A dessert containing primarily oranges and flaked coconut.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The food of certain wood-boring beetles, consisting of various hyphomycetous fungi found associated with the beetles in their galleries, and said by some authors to be propagated by them, each species of beetle using a particular species of fungus.
  • noun In Gr. legend, a celestial substance, capable of imparting immortality, commonly represented as the food of the gods, but sometimes as their drink, and also as a richly perfumed unguent; hence, in literature, anything comparable in character to either of these conceptions.
  • noun A genus of widely distributed coarse annual weeds, of the natural order Compositæ, chiefly American, and generally known as ragweed. A. artemisiæfolia is also called Roman wormwood or hogweed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The fabled food of the gods (as nectar was their drink), which conferred immortality upon those who partook of it.
  • noun An unguent of the gods.
  • noun A perfumed unguent, salve, or draught; something very pleasing to the taste or smell.
  • noun Formerly, a kind of fragrant plant; now (Bot.), a genus of plants, including some coarse and worthless weeds, called ragweed, hogweed, etc.
  • noun (Zoöl.) The food of certain small bark beetles, family Scolytidæ believed to be fungi cultivated by the beetles in their burrows.
  • noun A dessert made from shredded coconuts and oranges, sometimes including other ingredients such as marshmallow.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Greek mythology, Roman mythology The food of the gods, thought to confer immortality.
  • noun Any food with an especially delicious flavour or fragrance.
  • noun A mixture of nectar and pollen prepared by worker bees and fed to larvae.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any of numerous chiefly North American weedy plants constituting the genus Ambrosia that produce highly allergenic pollen responsible for much hay fever and asthma
  • noun (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
  • noun fruit dessert made of oranges and bananas with shredded coconut
  • noun a mixture of nectar and pollen prepared by worker bees and fed to larvae

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin, from Greek ambrosiā, from ambrotos, immortal, immortalizing; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin ambrosia ("food of the gods"), from Ancient Greek ἀμβροσία (ambrosia, "immortality"), from ἄμβροτος (ambrotos, "immortal"), from ἀ- ("not") + βροτός (brotos, "mortal").

Examples

  • When ambrosia is in my cup and the delightful smell is wafting in my nose, I sit down at my computer and ignore my children arguing over who gets the last Poptart and who is stuck with plain old cornflakes.

    Invisible Man @ Attack of the Redneck Mommy

  • It's funny how ambrosia is a totally different thing here (and in Portugal as well).

    My Ambrosia

  • “Gods and goddesses stay immortal by eating a divine confection called ambrosia and by sipping nectar,” she read.

    ATHENA THE BRAIN

  • "Eat, and thank Providence for such delights as this, which you infidels call ambrosia," says he, while one of his women put the dish of honey-coloured curds before me.

    The Sky Writer

  • “Gods and goddesses stay immortal by eating a divine confection called ambrosia and by sipping nectar,” she read.

    ATHENA THE BRAIN

  • These are called ambrosia-beetles, because of the dainty food they eat.

    Little Busybodies The Life of Crickets, Ants, Bees, Beetles, and Other Busybodies

  • There were always a good many lady's-delights that grew under the bushes, and came up anywhere in the chinks of the walk or the door-step; and there was a little green sprig called ambrosia that was a famous stray-away.

    From A Mournful Villager

  • There were always a good many lady's-delights that grew under the bushes, and came up anywhere in the chinks of the walk of the door-step, and there was a little green sprig called ambrosia that was a famous stray-away.

    Deephaven and Selected Stories & Sketches

  • Not dissimilar to the 1960's standby in the 'burbs of Toronto called "ambrosia" which was a white sweet glommy glob including coconut flakes, tinned mandarin orange segments and other preserved ingredients.

    latter-day fixin's!

  • The two wardens proved very pleasant fellows indeed; and declared that the cup of coffee which was brewed for them was nectar, "ambrosia," Mr. Lawrence called it.

    The Strange Cabin on Catamount Island

Comments

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  • Vegetal ambrosia, precious grain scattered

    By the eternal Sower, I shall descend in you

    So that from our love there will be born poetry,

    Which will spring up toward God like a rare flower!

    The Soul of Wine

    Charles Baudelaire

    March 30, 2007

  • US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906: telegraphers' shorthand for "No agreement probable (unless)".

    January 19, 2013