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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Responsive to advice, authority, or suggestion; willing.
  • adj. Responsible to higher authority; accountable: amenable to the law. See Synonyms at responsible.
  • adj. Susceptible or open, as to testing or criticism: "The phenomenon of mind . . . is much more complex, though also more amenable to scientific investigation, than anyone suspected” ( Michael D. Lemonick).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Willing to respond to persuasion or suggestions.
  • adj. Willing to comply with; agreeable.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Easy to be led; governable, as a woman by her husband.
  • adj. Liable to be brought to account or punishment; answerable; responsible; accountable.
  • adj. Liable to punishment, a charge, a claim, etc.
  • adj. Willing to yield or submit; responsive; tractable.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Liable to make answer or defense; answerable; accountable; responsible: said of persons.
  • Under subjection or subordination; liable or exposed, as to authority, control, claim, or application: said of persons or things: as, persons or offenses amenable to the law; amenable to criticism.
  • Disposed or ready to answer, yield, or submit, as to influence or advice; submissive.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. disposed or willing to comply
  • adj. open to being acted upon in a certain way
  • adj. liable to answer to a higher authority
  • adj. readily reacting to suggestions and influences

Etymologies

Probably alteration of Middle English menable, from Old French, from mener, to lead, from Latin mināre, to drive, from minārī, to threaten, from minae, threats; see men-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French as if *amenable, from amener ("to bring or lead, fetch in or to"), from a- + mener ("to lead, conduct"), from Late Latin minare ("to drive"), Latin deponent minari ("to threaten, menace"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Even in straight achievement terms amenable to current games, imagine for example a paladin who gained bonuses for things like making a personal sacrifice for weaker members of a party your paladin receives buffs when rezzing if by your death the mob was killed while other party members who had sustained over 50% damage did not die.

    February 2006

  • And the White House has always believed that that would eventually occur, and occur more or less on terms amenable to both sides.

    CNN Transcript Jul 5, 2001

  • Magistrates hold their offices as trustees for the people, and they are amenable, that is, answerable, to the people.

    Civil Government of Virginia

  • · The US ranks last in the industrialized world on rates of "mortality amenable to health care" -- that is, the nation's care system often fails to manage those conditions that we know how to prevent or treat ( "amenable" conditions), resulting in premature death and suffering.

    Joe McCannon and Maureen Bisognano: The American Health Care System Is in Pieces -- But Some of the Pieces Are Doing Remarkably Well

  • One cabinet minister even suggested having Israel appoint "amenable" Palestinian governors in each West Bank town, a program that failed miserably in the 1970s.

    The Bad Old Days Are Back

  • Now that Sandals has shown he'll flip flop, and since we already know he takes PAC money, that makes him appear much more likely to be "amenable" and owing to the NOW PAC.

    Printing: N.O.W. Blows it AGAIN on PA Senate Race

  • Why can't I be 'amenable' and become a future duchess, and 'build up' the fortunes of a great family?

    God's Good Man

  • Under state law, the attorneys had to persuade the judge that he was more "amenable" to rehabilitation in the juvenile system -- which would have jurisdiction only until he is 21 -- than as an adult.

    The Washington Times stories: Latest Headlines

  • Under state law, the attorneys had to convince the judge that he was more "amenable" to rehabilitation in the juvenile system - which would have jurisdiction only until he is 21 - than as an adult.

    KPIX: Top Stories Videos

  • Under state law, the attorneys had to convince the judge that he was more 'amenable' to rehabilitation in the juvenile system - which would have jurisdiction only until he is 21 - than as an adult.

    Home | Mail Online

Comments

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  • Railroad telegraphers' shorthand meaning "will make no agreement". --US Railway Association, Standard Cipher Code, 1906.

    January 19, 2013