Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The common shrimp, Crangon vulgaris.
  • noun The popular name of a number of conirostral oscine passerine birds of the genus Emberiza and family Fringillidæ.
  • noun By extension, a name given indefinitely and indiscriminately to a great number of emberizine and fringilline birds of all countries, and also to some birds not of the family Fringillidæ.
  • Short and thick-set.
  • noun A short and thick-set person.
  • noun A light woolen stuff very loosely woven.
  • noun Flags, especially a vessel's flags, collectively.
  • noun The act of swelling out, as a sail.
  • noun The act of pushing, as with the horns or head; butting.
  • noun A game among boys, played with sticks and a small piece of wood cut lengthwise.
  • noun A large piece of timber; a heavy support for machinery or other structures.
  • noun Sifting.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) A bird of the genus Emberiza, or of an allied genus, related to the finches and sparrows (family Fringillidæ).
  • noun A thin woolen stuff, used chiefly for flags, colors, and ships' signals.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Strips of material used as festive decoration, especially in the colours of the national flag.
  • noun nautical A thin cloth of woven wool from which flags are made; it is light enough to spread in a gentle wind but resistant to fraying in a strong wind.
  • noun Flags considered as a group.
  • noun Any of various songbirds, mostly of the genus Emberiza, having short bills and brown or gray plumage.
  • verb Present participle of bunt.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a loosely woven fabric used for flags, etc.
  • noun any of numerous seed-eating songbirds of Europe or North America

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Possibly from dialect bunting ("sifting flour"), from Middle English bonten ("to sift"), hence the material used for that purpose.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

See bunt

Examples

  • Though slightly ad hoc, the bunting is at least cheerful, and appears to be strung between ground-floor window-frames.

    Archive 2009-03-01

  • … Doesn't he know sacrifice bunting is a waste of time?

    Part Manager, Part Motivator

  • Patterson said he would bunt if his team needed a baserunner in a close game or if he was struggling, but added, "If I'm swinging the bat well, bunting is the last thing I'm thinking about."

    USATODAY.com - National League Central

  • And in fact, statistically, pitchers bunting is the only way in which NL baseball is vastly different than AL baseball.

    USATODAY.com - Time to blow up those AL, NL myths

  • It shows that bunting is becoming a lost art in baseball.

    Cubbies close to infamous mark

  • The canals were packed with gay barges, houses flaunted in bunting and floral decorations, and a festive air was prevalent in every quarter of the city.

    Jacqueline of the Carrier-Pigeons

  • He thought they resembled the European reed bunting, so drew from the Latin word for "rush," juncus, and that's how the junco got its name.

    StarTribune.com rss feed

  • He thought they resembled the European reed bunting, so drew from the Latin word for "rush," juncus, and that's how the junco got its name.

    StarTribune.com rss feed

  • “This is the painted bunting, that is the swallow-tailed hawk.”

    The Memory Palace

  • “This is the painted bunting, that is the swallow-tailed hawk.”

    The Memory Palace

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