Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An inspiring standard or symbol.
  • noun The red or orange-red flag of the Abbey of Saint Denis in France, used as a standard by the early kings of France.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The banner of St. Denis, supposed to have been a plain red gonfalon — that is, a banderole of two or three points attached to a lance.
  • noun In heraldry, a blue flag or banner charged with three golden fleurs-de-lis.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun history The red silk banner of St Denis, which the abbot of St Denis gave to French kings as they rode to war.
  • noun figuratively Any banner, idea or principle which serves as a rallying point for those involved in a struggle.
  • noun literary Something resembling the banner of St Denis; a bright, shining object.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an inspiring symbol or ideal that serves as a rallying point in a struggle
  • noun a red or orange-red flag used as a standard by early French kings

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English oriflamble, banner of St. Denis, from Old French, variant of oriflambe, possibly from Medieval Latin aurea flamma, auriflamma (Latin aurea, feminine of aureus, golden, from aurum, gold + Latin flamma, flame; see flame) or alteration of Old French *lorie flambe (from Late Latin laurea flammula, laureled standard : Latin laurea, feminine of laureus, of laurel; see laureate + Latin flammula, banner, diminutive of flamma, flame).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French oriflambe, oriflamme, from Medieval Latin auriflamma ("golden flame"), from Latin aurum ("gold") + flamma ("flame").

Examples

Comments

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  • A very nice word, but I don't know where I could wear it.

    June 21, 2007

  • For some reason I associate this word with fields. But I don't know what that reason is.

    I suppose you would find an oriflamme on a battlefield.

    February 6, 2008

  • What a cool word!

    February 6, 2008

  • I always think of orcs.

    February 6, 2008

  • Seanahan: endures orc. See anagram.

    February 6, 2008

  • seanahan: you always think of orcs when you think of oriflammes, or you always think of orcs, period?

    February 7, 2008

  • I always think of orcs when I see the word oriflamme.

    February 7, 2008