Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The raised rear part of a saddle.
  • noun A corner, segment, or portion; a piece.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A corner; fragment; piece; portion.
  • noun The protuberant part of a saddle behind; the hind bow.
  • To cut into pieces; cut a piece out of.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb obsolete To cut in pieces; to cut out from.
  • noun A corner or edge of anything; a piece; a fragment; a part.
  • noun The upwardly projecting rear part of saddle, opposite to the pommel.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun obsolete A splinter, slice, or sliver broken off something.
  • noun The raised back of a saddle.
  • verb obsolete, transitive To cut into pieces.
  • verb obsolete, transitive To cut out from.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the back of a saddle seat

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English cantel, corner, from Old French, from Medieval Latin cantellus, from Vulgar Latin *cantus; see cant.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old Northern French cantel, Old French chantel (Modern French chanteau), from Medieval Latin cantellus, diminutive of Latin cantus ("corner").

Examples

  • We ' re left to guess, for instance, what it means that a man has his camelhair jacket shoggling over the cantle of the saddle.

    Southwestern Gothic

  • “Lean back and grasp the cantle,” Mr. Conner instructed.

    Canterwood Crest Triple Fault

  • “Lean back and grasp the cantle,” Mr. Conner instructed.

    Canterwood Crest Triple Fault

  •   The cantle, in back, was fairly low, about like an American ‘western’ saddle, to make for easy mounting.

    Lord Conrads Crusade

  • Meek-as-milk-water Nightlily leaped ahead so fast that she nearly pitched backward over the cantle.

    Knife of Dreams

  • She closed her hands tight over the cantle of the rider's saddle, feeling nervous at being mounted with no reins in her hand.

    Ill Met By Moonlight

  • The Dike, extending from the rough North Sea to the calmer waters of Bridlington Bay, is nothing more than a deep dry trench, skillfully following the hollows of the ground, and cutting off Flamborough Head and a solid cantle of high land from the rest of Yorkshire.

    Mary Anerley

  • Grasping the horn in one hand, the cantle in his other, he stiffly pulled himself onto the burro.

    Deuces Wild

  • Sabin plucked Strongfist's arming cap and helm from the strap behind the saddle cantle and, drawing Lucifer close, reached up to place them on Strongfist's head.

    The Falcons of Montabard

  • Doubtful rights go cheap; and so the foreshore westward of the brook being claimed by divers authorities, a tidy little cantle of it had been leased by Admiral Darling, lord of the manor, to

    Springhaven

Comments

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  • A portion or corner, as of land, cut off from a larger whole.

    June 19, 2008