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  • Tries to imagine what a chained bear in waffle hose looks like and faints away ...

    September 19, 2009

  • ... and, of course, cheese grits. :) And they always call you "hon" or "sweetie" or something.

    Well, they do for me, anyhow...

    September 18, 2009

  • Maple syrup on my elbows. I really like to watch the dynamics of the behind-the-counter Waffle House staff. Especially when one is cranky, one is hung over, and another is going through a relationship trauma. Life's vicissitudes, condensed into a live 5-minute cooking show. With maple syrup.

    September 18, 2009

  • Yesss.... :) I love Waffle Hose too. The jukebox with silly Waffle-House-themed songs on it (as well as more recognizable ones), the ancient photos of food hung way up by the ceiling, the waitresses who shout your incomprehensible hash browns order at the toothless cooks from only about three feet away...

    September 18, 2009

  • Oh Waffle House, how I love thee! Best thing about the South. Here I am in front of one, in February 2002. That's from four cross-country road trips ago (I move too much).

    The little white Honda, aka The Lemming, sure was a trooper.

    September 18, 2009

  • Yuuuuuummmm....

    September 17, 2009

  • Yes!!! Yes!! I jones for Waffle House Cheese 'n Eggs (I know, but they spell it with just the one apostrophe...) all the time! In fact I just braved the smoke and grease to have some on Sunday! Food of the gods...

    A friend and I call it Waffle Hose for the same reason--the U in the sign was burned out.

    September 17, 2009

  • Well, I s'pose, but a doorbell definitely goes bing-bong, and as far as I can hear the bong there is a tone issue.

    Moving to Indonesian, it doesn't really have long vowels. So a small bell might go keling and a big one kelung, but both vowels are short. On the other hand, there are plenty of Javanese words that have crept into the language and Javanese does have something of a tradition of allowing lengthening of vowels for rhetorical effect. Thus, a word like gede, small, has a standard pronunciation with two short vowels, but if you feel like exaggerating you can go to town on the last one. Lastly, I remember a girl once joking about a bitil (nonce word) being a very small botol, bottle.

    September 17, 2009

  • plink/plonk/plunk, in reference to entries on this thread. I note that the middle term of the three here sometimes is accompanied by an exclamation point, but can give no examples.

    September 17, 2009

  • Does anyone have a jones for cheesy eggs, sausage and grits, and cinnamon raisin toast from Waffle House (a friend likes to call it "Awful House" after noting a sign whose "W" had fallen off) ;>)

    September 17, 2009

  • Somehow I knew this pleasurable thread was heading towards Mixbury. (toponym derived from the Old English mixen-burgh, meaning "fortification near dung-heap") - in the sense that dung was bound to enter the conversation! Good comedy again, from sionnach's witty pen.

    September 17, 2009

  • little bells "ding" or "bing", bigger bells "dong" or "bong".

    and if you hear cow bells, can "dung" be far behind?

    September 17, 2009

  • I guess droplet falls somewhere in size between drip/drop.

    September 17, 2009

  • My feeling about ding/dong and bing/bong is that little bells "ding" or "bing", bigger bells "dong" or "bong". So in my mind there is a size difference behind the pitch difference. Tick/tock I'd have a harder time shoehorning into a size or intensity difference.

    September 17, 2009

  • Glue's bad for you. Makes you sick.

    September 17, 2009

  • I don't associate bing/bong and tick/tock with increase in size or intensity, rather with change in pitch.

    In Italian there is definitely a correlation as represented in the suffixes -ino and -one. Variants of them sometimes occur in English, though not in the pairs hernesheir is referring to.

    September 17, 2009

  • My first thought was "cream of wheat! Ick!" Why not just eat glue?

    Hernesheir, that's a very interesting observation. Have you found it to be pretty universal? That is, is the effect due to the broadened vowel, do you think, or is the broadened vowel the cause of the meaning?

    September 17, 2009

  • I like to ponder word pairs such as grit/groat, bing/bong, stamp/stomp, stick/stock, tick/tock, plink/plonk/plunk where a broadening of the vowel in the second of the pair marks an increase in size or intensity.

    A similar phenomenon occurs in some English strong verbs such as sink/sank/sunk, where, if one thinks about it, the "finality of sinking" seems to increase as the vowel broadens in the tense changes.

    Any thoughts, Wordies?

    September 17, 2009

  • I thought my love for cream of wheat would naturaly predispose me to grits. Was I ever wrong! Yick, gritty.

    September 17, 2009

  • Poor li'l singed fire fox.

    September 17, 2009

  • Sionnach has finally lost his mind. *shakes head sadly*

    September 17, 2009

  • I like to think of grits (especially the yellow variety) as nascent polenta - leave the leftovers (one always makes too much, if one does it correctly) in the pan or in the icebox overnight, and Hey Presto! - polenta is born. Then those leftovers suddenly can be prepared in the Italian style.

    September 17, 2009

  • "really good cheese grits"

    now there's an oxymoron if ever there was one!

    The title John O' Groats seems to be taken, but maybe bilby could be the Pinkie O' Grits.

    Singed

    Tam O' Shanter, Paddy O' Furniture, and all the other Peep O' Day Boys.

    September 16, 2009

  • Yeah baby! I could LIVE on grits (having acquired the taste for them during my 6 years in Atlanta, Georgia). I do remember that in my pre-vegan days, nothing beat a bowl of cheddar cheese grits topped with a fried egg.

    These days it's a heap of organic Smart Balance and lots of salt & pepper to compliment my critter-friendly bowl of grits. They still taste fantastic!

    September 16, 2009

  • Can't remember ever having grits ... it's just the word, all panelbeater's workshop and dust-storm.

    September 16, 2009

  • I think bilby just hasn't had really good cheese grits yet. :)

    *against her will, starts wondering where she can get really good cheese grits in the next half-hour*

    September 16, 2009

  • Bilby - groats is a word that is pretty unattractive - kind of grates on the ears, no? But I love buckwheat groats - prepared as kasha....

    September 16, 2009

  • Head cheese?

    September 16, 2009

  • *trying to think of a more unattractive food word than grits*

    *struggling*

    September 16, 2009

  • Some southern folks would think a meal incomplete if there were no grits on the plate - especially breakfast.

    September 16, 2009

  • White (or yellow) corn grits to which has been added one's favorite melting cheese.

    September 10, 2009