Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To slobber; drool.
  • intransitive verb To flow like spittle or saliva.
  • intransitive verb To talk stupidly or childishly.
  • intransitive verb To allow to flow from the mouth.
  • intransitive verb To say (something) stupidly.
  • noun Saliva flowing from the mouth.
  • noun Stupid or senseless talk.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To slaver; let spittle drop or flow from the mouth, like a child, an idiot, or a dotard.
  • To be weak or foolish; talk weakly or foolishly; dote.
  • noun Slaver; saliva flowing from the mouth.
  • noun Silly, unmeaning talk; inarticulate nonsense; senseless twaddle, like the talk of an idiot.
  • noun A servant; a drudge; a slave.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Slaver; saliva flowing from the mouth.
  • noun Inarticulate or unmeaning utterance; foolish talk; babble.
  • noun obsolete A driveler; a fool; an idiot.
  • noun obsolete A servant; a drudge.
  • intransitive verb To slaver; to let spittle drop or flow from the mouth, like a child, idiot, or dotard.
  • intransitive verb To be weak or foolish; to dote

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun senseless talk; nonsense
  • noun saliva, drool
  • noun obsolete A fool; an idiot.
  • noun obsolete A servant; a drudge.
  • verb To have saliva drip from the mouth; to drool.
  • verb To talk nonsense; to talk senselessly

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun saliva spilling from the mouth
  • noun a worthless message
  • verb let saliva drivel from the mouth

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English drevelen, from Old English dreflian.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English dravelen, drabelen, drevelen, drivelen, to slaver.

Examples

Comments

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  • See also drool.

    January 1, 2008

  • Poetry all weak lies, games. Epicurus, stupid lies, that there is nothing terrible in not living. Just to stay oh living, of, why can't I? Stupid childish helpless poor little frightened drivel.'>Pusillanimous drivel. frail poor me. Us all.

    - Peter Reading, C, 1984

    July 4, 2008

  • "At this B.'s intellect gives way, and he becomes simply drivelling."

    Jerome K. Jerome, Diary of a Pilgrimage

    August 15, 2008

  • *drooooools*

    September 7, 2008

  • JM watched a program that was pure as the drivel show.

    August 26, 2011