Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The passage of blood from ruptured blood vessels into subcutaneous tissue, marked by a purple discoloration of the skin.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A skin discoloration caused by bleeding underneath the skin; a bruise.
  • n. The leaking of blood into the tissues of the body as a result of a bruise.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A livid or black and blue spot, produced by the extravasation or effusion of blood into the areolar tissue from a contusion.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In medicine, a livid, black, or yellow spot produced by extravasated blood. In dermatology the word usually denotes an extravasation of greater extent than the small spots called petechiæ.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the escape of blood from ruptured blood vessels into the surrounding tissue to form a purple or black-and-blue spot on the skin
  • n. the purple or black-and-blue area resulting from a bruise

Etymologies

New Latin, from Greek ekkhumōsis, extravasation, from ekkhumousthai, to extravasate : ek-, out; see ecto- + khumos, juice; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From New Latin, from Ancient Greek ἐκχύμωσις (ekkhumōsis), from ἐκχέω (ekkheō, "I pour out"), from ἐκ (ek, "out") + χέω (kheō, "I pour") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "Yes, I suppose the blood has spread; there is what doctors call ecchymosis; give me some clean linen, pour into a glass equal parts of good olive oil and wine dregs, and wash that stain for me."

    The Forty-Five Guardsmen

  • Persons who, in jumping from a height, have pitched on the heel, so as to occasion diastasis (separation) of the bones, ecchymosis of the veins, and contusion of the nerves, - when these symptoms are very violent, there is danger that the parts may sphacelate, and give trouble to the patient during the remainder of his life; for these bones are so constructed as to slip past one another, and the nerves communicate together.

    Instruments Of Reduction

  • When persons jumping from a height pitch on the heel, so as to occasion separation (diastasis) of the bones, ecchymosis of the veins, and contusion of the nerves; when these symptoms are very violent there is danger of sphacelus, and that the case may give trouble during life, for the bones are so constructed as to slip from one another, and the nerves communicate together.

    On The Articulations

  • But if the case be not going to get worse, the ecchymosed and livid parts, and those surrounding them become greenish and not hard; for this is a satisfactory proof in all cases of ecchymosis, that they are not to get worse; but when lividity is complicated with hardness, there is danger that the part may become blackened.

    On Fractures

  • The outlines of the foot disappeared in such a swelling that the entire skin seemed about to burst, and it was covered with ecchymosis, caused by the famous machine.

    Madame Bovary

  • If a blow be inflicted with a blunt instrument, there is produced a bruise, or _ecchymosis_, of which it is unnecessary here to describe the appearance and progress.

    Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

  • It must be distinguished from ecchymosis the result of a bruise, by making an incision into the part; in the case of hypostasis a few small bloody points of divided arteries will be seen, in the case of ecchymosis the subcutaneous tissues are infiltrated with blood-clot.

    Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

  • Ordinarily, this ecchymosis of the horny sole is due to injury of the sensitive sole _immediately beneath_ it.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • Thus, with the hæmorrhage we get ecchymosis, and consequent red staining of the surrounding structures.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • In this case the ecchymosis of the horny sole may be explained by the fact that the escaped blood tends to _gravitate_ to that position.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

Comments

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  • "I mentally replayed the details of the operation... The diseased bowel itself, coiled like a viper, patterned with the purple splotches of ecchymosis and the slow leakage of bright blood from tiny ruptures...."
    —Diana Gabaldon, Voyager (NY: Dell, 1994), 266

    January 14, 2010

  • At least it's accurate this time; just not very precise.

    June 1, 2008

  • Fourth definition: Weirdnet.

    June 1, 2008

  • "The left leg and foot were encased in an appliance of splints and bandages, upon the removal of which, a fracture of the fibula ... accompanied by considerable ecchymosis, was discovered."
    --letter from Surgeon General Barnes to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, April 1865, quoted in James L. Swanson, Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer, 352

    May 30, 2008