Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • A dialectal variant of at.
  • A suffix of Latin origin, another form of -ate, -ad, as in ballet, sallet, sonnet, etc. Compare the doublets ballad, salad, sonata.
  • A suffix of French or other Romance origin, properly diminutive in force, as in billet, billet, bullet, fillet, hatchet, islet, jacket, locket, mallet, pallet, pullet, ticket, etc.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • conjunction obsolete and
  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of eat.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French et, in turn from Latin et

Examples

Comments

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  • "'You've et a great big worm!' shrieked Gerald"

    -Anne of Windy Poplars

    June 1, 2009

  • My grandfather said this.

    June 1, 2009

  • Mine too.

    June 1, 2009

  • I associate it so strongly with Victorian and fin de siecle primness, but it sounds really rustic for all that.

    June 1, 2009

  • wiktionary should read: (colloquial) simple past tense and past participle of eat.

    January 22, 2011

  • Intriguing Flickr feed.

    April 29, 2011

  • See ampersand.

    April 29, 2011