Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An aircraft that derives its lift from blades that rotate about an approximately vertical central axis.
  • transitive v. To go or transport by helicopter.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An aircraft that is borne along by one or more sets of long rotating blades which allow it to hover, move in any direction including reverse, or land; and having a smaller set of blades on its tail that stabilize the aircraft.
  • n. a powered troweling machine with spinning blades used to spread concrete.
  • n. a winged fruit of certain trees, such as ash, elm, and maple
  • v. To transport by helicopter.
  • v. To travel by helicopter.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. a heavier-than-air aircraft whose lift is provided by the aerodynamic forces on rotating blades rather than on fixed wings. Contrasted with fixed-wing aircraft.
  • intransitive v. to travel in a helicopter.
  • transitive v. to transport in a helicopter.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A flying-machine in which revolving screws or revolving helicoidal surfaces are depended upon to sustain the machine in the air.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an aircraft without wings that obtains its lift from the rotation of overhead blades

Etymologies

French hélicoptère : Greek helix, helik-, spiral; see helix + Greek pteron, wing; see -pter.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French hélicoptère, from Ancient Greek ἕλιξ (helix, "spiral") + πτερόν (pteron, "wing"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • I will never fly in one again.

    September 27, 2012

  • "A flying-machine in which revolving screws or revolving helicoidal surfaces are depended upon to sustain the machine in the air."

    --Cent. Dict.

    September 24, 2012