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irreversibility

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The quality or condition of being irreversible; incapability of reversal or inversion.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The state or quality of being irreversible; irreversibleness.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The quality of being irreversible; the lack of an ability to be reversed.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the quality of being irreversible (once done it cannot be changed)

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From irreversible and -ibility.

Examples

  • The nonclassical irreversibility is more radical epistemologically or cognitively by virtue of the nonclassical nature of the processes responsible for the events in de Man's sense.

    Thinking Singularity with Immanuel Kant and Paul de Man: Aesthetics, Epistemology, History and Politics

  • The material irreversibility is due to the fact that nonclassical processes are, by definition, irreducibly irreversible in relation to the individual events they produce as their effects, or the nonclassical correlations between such events.

    Thinking Singularity with Immanuel Kant and Paul de Man: Aesthetics, Epistemology, History and Politics

  • Something that does not have necessarily consequence or a long-term irreversibility - because you can always play the game again - as opposed to when you do something that you can't undo.

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  • That is the origin of all irreversibility, that is what makes the processes of growth and decay, that makes us remember the past and not the future, remember the things which are closer to that moment in history of the universe when the order was higher than now, and why we are not able to remember things where the disorder is higher than now, which we call the future.

    Richard Feynman on Boltzmann Brains

  • The problem is that "irreversibility" as used in much of the literature on global climate change, as well as in the debates over sustainability and the precautionary principle, suggests that its causes are simple, known, predictable, and that its effects are uniformly negative.

    Archive 2007-03-01

  • My most recent post added "irreversibility" to that list and said I would move on to explore how successful two management approaches--unrestrained markets versus cost-benefit regulation--are likely to be in defying this inherent challenge.

    Archive 2007-03-01

  • My concern arises from the growing use of "irreversibility" as a buzzword in discourse on looming issues such as global climate change, sustainable development, and the precautionary principle.

    More on Irreversibility and its Importance

  • My concern arises from the growing use of "irreversibility" as a buzzword in discourse on looming issues such as global climate change, sustainable development, and the precautionary principle.

    Archive 2007-03-01

  • My most recent post added "irreversibility" to that list and said I would move on to explore how successful two management approaches--unrestrained markets versus cost-benefit regulation--are likely to be in defying this inherent challenge.

    More on Irreversibility and its Importance

  • The problem is that "irreversibility" as used in much of the literature on global climate change, as well as in the debates over sustainability and the precautionary principle, suggests that its causes are simple, known, predictable, and that its effects are uniformly negative.

    More on Irreversibility and its Importance

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