Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Characterized by lethargy; sluggish.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Heavy; slow; stupid.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective U.S. Heavy or dull in respect to motion or thought.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Slow to respond or react; lethargic.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective stunned or confused and slow to react (as from blows or drunkenness or exhaustion)

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Perhaps from Dutch log, heavy or variant of English loggy, heavy, sluggish, from log.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Attested from the 19th century, of uncertain origin, perhaps from Dutch log "heavy, dull".

Examples

  • All that is required is to add the Greek word "logy" to the name, and force them to conform to a set rubric, and the science is all complete.

    What to Do?

  • All that is required is to add the Greek word "logy" to the name, and force them to conform to a set rubric, and the science is all complete.

    On the Significance of Science and Art

  • And I'm still kind of logy from either too much napping, or still not enough to make up for the sleep deficit.

    idiot-milk Diary Entry

  • In her spare time she felt rather "logy", rarely went out, except now and then at night with her husband, and spent her leisure hours on the couch reading or nibbling.

    The Nervous Housewife

  • He spends a good part of his day making raids on the ice chest, and it is a frequent enough result to find him "logy" on Monday.

    The Nervous Housewife

  • Each might be expressed by a word ending in "logy," therefore logic might be termed the "science of sciences."

    Mystic London: or, Phases of occult life in the metropolis

  • It seems to us, that if we add to a Greek word the word "logy," and call that a science, it will be a science; and, if we call any abominable thing -- like the dancing of nude females -- by a

    What to Do?

  • It seems to us, that if we add to a Greek word the word "logy," and call that a science, it will be a science; and, if we call any abominable thing -- like the dancing of nude females -- by a

    On the Significance of Science and Art

  • But we know that "logy" is really code for "get me out of here, stat!"

    User Friendly RSS Feed

  • But it gives rise to yet more questions, like: Why self, and in what way (the way of psycho -, socio -, anthropo-logy? or are we talking philosophy?).

    I is for Identity « An A-Z of ELT

Comments

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  • In Newfoundland English, logy (also spelled logey or loggy) means 'heavy, slow-moving.' Occurs as a place name, such as "Logy Bay." 1) Said "of persons (animals, fish, etc), heavy, sluggish, in poor condition; dull. 2) Of a vessel, slow-moving, deep-laden and heavy in sailing. 3) Of the weather, (a) heavy (with moisture); (b) oppressively hot. (Dictionary of Newfoundland English)

    In this same dictionary, the OED is cited defining logy as "fish of inferior quality. A large cod-fish; SOAKER."

    January 5, 2008