Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In Mexico, any one of several plants having narcotic properties; in many localities, Cannabis Indica, and in the state of Sonora, Nicotiana glauca.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Alternative spelling of marijuana.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the most commonly used illicit drug; considered a soft drug, it consists of the dried leaves of the hemp plant; smoked or chewed for euphoric effect
  • noun a strong-smelling plant from whose dried leaves a number of euphoriant and hallucinogenic drugs are prepared

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The term "marihuana" means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin.

    Robbie Gennet: How Do You Quantify a Hallucination? And Why Are They Illegal?

  • The bill calls "to amend the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of marihuana" and allow states to regulate hemp laws.

    Dar Williams: Hemp: Republicans to the Rescue!

  • The bill calls "to amend the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of marihuana" and allow states to regulate hemp laws.

    Dar Williams: Hemp: Republicans to the Rescue!

  • Colonel Plummer of the Twenty-eighth Infantry advertises that the sale of cocaine and marihuana is prohibited except on a doctor's prescription, and that violation of this order will be severely punished.

    Lawgivers

  • The Court of Appeals framed the issue as follows: “[W] hether the imposition of felony consequences, based upon possession of small amounts of marihuana, which would constitute a violation outside of prison (see Penal Law §§ 221.05, 221.10 [2] [absent aggravating circumstances, not present here, possession of 25 grams or less of marihuana is a non-criminal violation]), comports with the Legislature’s intent as codified in Penal Law §§ 205.00 (4) and 205.25 (2).”

    NY Court of Appeals

  • To the extent that the state’s interest in prohibiting marihuana is to prevent the harms associated with marihuana use including protecting the health of users, it is irrational to deprive a person of the drug when he or she requires it to maintain their health.

    The Solution is Insite, Part II : Law is Cool

  • The Court of Appeals framed the issue as follows: “[W] hether the imposition of felony consequences, based upon possession of small amounts of marihuana, which would constitute a violation outside of prison (see Penal Law §§ 221.05, 221.10 [2] [absent aggravating circumstances, not present here, possession of 25 grams or less of marihuana is a non-criminal violation]), comports with the Legislature’s intent as codified in Penal Law §§ 205.00 (4) and 205.25 (2).”

    Sui Generis--a New York law blog:

  • The Court of Appeals framed the issue as follows: “[W] hether the imposition of felony consequences, based upon possession of small amounts of marihuana, which would constitute a violation outside of prison (see Penal Law §§ 221.05, 221.10 [2] [absent aggravating circumstances, not present here, possession of 25 grams or less of marihuana is a non-criminal violation]), comports with the Legislature’s intent as codified in Penal Law §§ 205.00 (4) and 205.25 (2).”

    Unlikely Inferences Do Not a Felony Make

  • The Court of Appeals framed the issue as follows: “[W] hether the imposition of felony consequences, based upon possession of small amounts of marihuana, which would constitute a violation outside of prison (see Penal Law §§ 221.05, 221.10 [2] [absent aggravating circumstances, not present here, possession of 25 grams or less of marihuana is a non-criminal violation]), comports with the Legislature’s intent as codified in Penal Law §§ 205.00 (4) and 205.25 (2).”

    Criminal Law

  • The Court of Appeals framed the issue as follows: “[W] hether the imposition of felony consequences, based upon possession of small amounts of marihuana, which would constitute a violation outside of prison (see Penal Law §§ 221.05, 221.10 [2] [absent aggravating circumstances, not present here, possession of 25 grams or less of marihuana is a non-criminal violation]), comports with the Legislature’s intent as codified in Penal Law §§ 205.00 (4) and 205.25 (2).”

    Daily Record--Legal Currents Column

Comments

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  • cáñamo índico, cuyas hojas, fumadas como tabaco, producen trastornos físicos y mentales. �? ¡Mentira cochina!

    October 22, 2007

  • This is the English spelling of the word that you'll find in many of the exploitation films of the thirties and forties--e.g., Reefer Madness.

    October 22, 2007

  • You know, it really is a pretty word. Guess it depends on how you pronounce it. Gotta use a strong fake accent and exaggerate the H sound: "mahdeeHHUUWWanna!"

    October 23, 2007

  • So, do you pronounce marihuna like muddy /'mʌdɪ/ + iguana /ɪ'wɑ:nə/?

    October 23, 2007

  • Yes, as you've defined those pronunciations, although I usually pronounce a hard "G" in iguana. I'm entirely gringo and only say marijuana with a strong accent when I'm in the right (read: silly) mood. All other times I sound much more uncultured and American. ;-)

    October 23, 2007