Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A great number or quantity.
  • noun The note sounded on a hunting horn to announce the death of a deer.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Death.
  • noun A flourish sounded at the death of game.
  • Dead.
  • noun The skin of a sheep or lamb which has died by accident or disease.
  • noun A woman.
  • noun A great quantity or number.
  • noun A salmon in the third year.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Prov. Eng. A great quantity or number.
  • noun Death; esp., the death of game in the chase.
  • noun A note or series of notes sounded on a horn at the death of game.
  • noun Prov. Eng. & Scot. The skin of a sheep or lamb that has died of disease.
  • noun the pall spread over a coffin; black cloth indicative or mourning; funeral hangings.
  • noun [Eng.] a large stone by the wayside on which the bearers rest a coffin.
  • noun A variety of dummy whist for three players; also, the exposed or dummy hand in this game.
  • noun Cant, archaic A woman; a female.
  • noun (Zoöl.), Prov. Eng. A salmon in its third year.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A note sounded on a horn at the death of a deer.
  • noun UK, Scotland, dialect The skin of a sheep or lamb that has died of disease.
  • noun Internet, informal A player in a multi-user dungeon who does not have special administrator privileges and whose character can be killed.
  • noun A great quantity or number.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Perhaps from mortal.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, death, from Old French, from Latin mors, mort-; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French mort ("death").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Shortening of mortal.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Unknown

Examples

  • Maillart for answer smote at him, crying, "Traitor, _à mort, à mort_!"

    The Story of Paris

  • It was a sombre night, and as the unsuspecting prince rode up the Rue Vieille du Temple behind his little escort, humming a tune and playing with his glove, a band of assassins fell upon him from the shadow of the postern La Barbette, crying "_à mort, à mort_" and he was hacked to death.

    The Story of Paris

  • Anything with Mor, since mort is Latin for death: Mordred, Mordor,

    Fritinancy

  • One possessed of a renewable term mort - gages it to J. S, who gains a new term from the original landlord, to com - mence after the old one; this nev term shall be subject to the old eqoity of redemption. ihid.

    Reports of cases argued and determined in the High Court of Chancery, and of some special cases adjudged in the Court of King's Bench [1695-1735]

  • I think I could agree with this, i think mat comes from the Persian word maut and NOT the latin mort which means death, i think the word mort is obtained from persian which means death.

    Checkmate has me 'at a loss'

  • (I just can't help but associate "mort" gage with the french word for death.)

    amishboy Diary Entry

  • Marguerite of Valois, sister of Francis I, could never utter the words "mort" or "petite verole," such a horrible aversion had she to death and small-pox.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • In English, the nearest equivalent is 'mort', the note sounded on a hunting horn to announce the death of a deer. marxist theory ..

    Kasama

  • In English, the nearest equivalent is 'mort', the note sounded on a hunting horn to announce the death of a deer. marxist theory ..

    Kasama

  • In English, the nearest equivalent is 'mort', the note sounded on a hunting horn to announce the death of a deer. marxist theory ..

    Kasama

Comments

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  • "'It's a mort o' snow,' he said, somehow making it official. 'A mighty mort o' snow.'"

    I Am Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley, p 130

    November 26, 2011