Definitions

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Etymologies

From Pavlova ("a surname"), from Russian Павлова ("Pávlova"), after ballerina Anna Pavlova (1881-1931). Australia / New Zealand from circa 1930. Both New Zealand and Australia lay claim to origination of the dish and the name. According to research undertaken by the Oxford English Dictionary, however, the earliest known attestation for the term is from New Zealand in 1927. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • At its core a pavlova is a meringue nest, into which a layer of custardy-type filling is nestled, and then topped with whip cream, and traditionally garnished with fruit, particularly tart berries.

    Archive 2009-07-01

  • Light, sweet pavlova is a great dessert because it is so versatile.

    Bites from other Blogs | Baking Bites

  • Conclusion: Of the thirty-one wholly explicit uses in print of Pavlova or pavlova as the name for a color, all occur in advertisements placed by seven Melbourne department stores in the Argus newspaperbetween April 26, 1926, and October 20, 1928, whereupon the term utterly vanishes from sight.

    The definitive Pavlova color spectrum

  • Complete chronological list of 31 references in the Argus newspaper (Melbourne) to “Pavlova” or “pavlova” as the name for a “new season” color, together with all accompanying named colors or shades, 1926 – 28:

    The definitive Pavlova color spectrum

  • Argus newspaper (Melbourne), colors, pavlova (color) comments:

    The definitive Pavlova color spectrum

  • However, I was shocked to find that they ascribe pavlova, n. (p. 832) simply to orig.

    Even More Pavlova

  • My own researches have clearly demonstrated that the canonical pavlova was named in New Zealand, and co-opted soon afterwards by the envious Depression-era housewives of Australia.

    Even More Pavlova

  • Meanwhile, pavlova, n., the brave promotional gambit of Davis Gelatine (a rather sordid jelly concocted with inter alia milk and orange juice), and pavlova, n., the American ice-cream (c. 1926) of which I can find no trace at all, evidently require separate definitions.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • Certainly where pavlova went, more often than not bois de rose went also.

    Further thoughts about “Pavlova”

  • I adore pavlova, as in the luscious meringue dessert accompanied by a sweet sauce of stewed berries.

    The Pavlova again

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