Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, resembling, or befitting a saint.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Like or characteristic of a saint; befitting a holy person; saintlike.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Like a saint; becoming a holy person.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Like or characteristic of a saint; befitting a holy person; saintlike.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. marked by utter benignity; resembling or befitting an angel or saint

Etymologies

From saint +‎ -ly. Compare saintlike. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • After breakfast, having satisfied himself before the mirror that his dress was faultless, and his expression saintly, he went out and travelled by rail from Sloane Square to West Kensington, whence he walked to Laurel Grove.

    The Irrational Knot Being the Second Novel of His Nonage

  • "Is that what you call saintly, spending all your time with Lady

    The Path Of Duty

  • When I was a baby and toddler, I learned to walk by hanging onto the head and ears of a very patient - one might say "saintly" - basset hound named Rebel.

    Best Products & Practices

  • The problem of demarcation also plagues the paradigm case of supererogatory behavior, the so-called saintly and heroic acts.

    How to Kill a Missionary

  • On July 29, 1894, God called my saintly and much-tried Father to

    Story of a Soul (l'Histoire d'une Ame): The Autobiography of St. Therese of Lisieux

  • On July 29, 1894, God called my saintly and much-tried Father to Himself.

    The Story of a Soul

  • The resignation might almost be called saintly, were it not that it seems to spring rather from the natural melancholy and sadness of Shakespeare's disposition; “the world is a hard, all-hating world,” he seems to say, “and misery is the natural lot of man; defeat comes to all; why should I hope for any better fortune?”

    The Man Shakespeare

  • The resignation might almost be called saintly, were it not that it seems to spring rather from the natural melancholy and sadness of Shakespeare's disposition; "the world is a hard, all-hating world," he seems to say, "and misery is the natural lot of man; defeat comes to all; why should I hope for any better fortune?"

    The Man Shakespeare

  • It results in the kind of character that is known as saintly, and is generally accompanied by a strong deficiency in the matter of humour.

    At Large

  • 'For in the ninth year Persephone sends the souls of those from whom she has received the penalty of ancient crime back again from beneath into the light of the sun above, and these are they who become noble kings and mighty men and great in wisdom and are called saintly heroes in after ages.'

    Meno

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