Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A widely cultivated southwest Asian plant (Spinacia oleracea) having succulent edible leaves.
  • n. The leaves of this plant, eaten as a vegetable.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A particular edible plant, Spinacia oleracea.
  • n. Any of numerous plants which are used for greens in the same way spinach is.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A common pot herb (Spinacia oleracea) belonging to the Goosefoot family.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A chenopodiaceous garden vegetable of the genus Spinacia, producing thick succulent leaves, which, when boiled and seasoned, form a pleasant and wholesome, though not highly flavored dish.
  • n. One of several other plants affording a dish like spinach. See phrases below.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. southwestern Asian plant widely cultivated for its succulent edible dark green leaves
  • n. dark green leaves; eaten cooked or raw in salads

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French espinache, from Medieval Latin spināchium, from Arabic 'isfānāḫ, from Persian espenāj, espenākh.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Via Arabic اسفاناخ (isfānākh), from Persian اسپناخ (ispanākh). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • If they're so succulent, why do they require seasoning and boiling??

    Heads need to roll over this one.

    July 1, 2011

  • I'm not sure whether CSP worked on this one. I just went to the Peirce Edition Project's site and saw spin, spindle-curve, and Spinozism, but no spinach.

    July 1, 2011

  • CSP always struck me as a meat-and-potatoes man.

    June 30, 2011

  • I love this definition from the Century: "1. A chenopodiaceous garden vegetable of the genus Spinacia, producing thick succulent leaves, which, when boiled and seasoned, form a pleasant and wholesome, though not highly flavored dish."

    June 30, 2011

  • Etymology: Middle French espinache, espinage, from Old Spanish espinaca, from Arabic isbnakh, isfinaakh, from Persian aspanakh.

    August 31, 2009

  • Popular food among Public Relations executives and Popeye.

    December 3, 2008