Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A sweet delicacy, such as a piece of candy or crystallized fruit.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A sweet thing to eat; an article of confectionery made wholly or principally of sugar; a bonbon: usually in the plural.
  • noun Fruit preserved with sugar, either moist or dry; a conserve; a preserve: usually in the plural.
  • noun One of the common slipper-limpets of the United States, Crepidula fornicata. See Crepidula.
  • noun A varnish for patent leather.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Fruit preserved with sugar, as peaches, pears, melons, nuts, orange peel, etc.; -- usually in the plural; a confect; a confection.
  • noun The paint used in making patent leather.
  • noun (Zoöl.), Local, U.S. A boat shell (Crepidula fornicata) of the American coast.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A sweet delicacy; a confection

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a sweetened delicacy (as a preserve or pastry)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Crunching such a delectable treat as a Pitmaston Pineapple, an old "sweetmeat" -- or small, sweet apple -- is the most enjoyable exercise I've come across, and I'm ready to plant a whole orchard of my own, if I can find a place to put it.

    Chicago Reader

  • Crunching such a delectable treat as a Pitmaston Pineapple, an old "sweetmeat" -- or small, sweet apple -- is the most enjoyable exercise I've come across, and I'm ready to plant a whole orchard of my own, if I can find a place to put it.

    Chicago Reader

  • “’Twas a certain sweetmeat-seller who drugged me and took the gear from me; but where is he gone?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • In public buildings, visitors are implored, through the same agency, to squirt the essence of their quids, or ‘plugs,’ as I have heard them called by gentlemen learned in this kind of sweetmeat, into the national spittoons, and not about the bases of the marble columns.

    American Notes for General Circulation

  • So Frisk went back and filled his basket with white bread, and red wine, and every kind of sweetmeat, until it was almost too heavy for him to carry.

    The Red Fairy Book

  • It was a delicious kind of sweetmeat, the like of which he had never tasted before; and the strangest thing about it was that it took his hunger and thirst away.

    The Book of Stories for the Story-teller

  • When each kind of sweetmeat was finished, she skimmed it, and put it away to cool in enormous bowls before potting.

    Good Cheer Stories Every Child Should Know

  • Every conceivable kind of sweetmeat and relish is displayed in the brightly lit window.

    The Haunted Bookshop

  • It was a delicious kind of sweetmeat, the like of which he had never tasted before; and the strangest thing about it was that it took his hunger and thirst away.

    Tales of Wonder Every Child Should Know

  • Cocoa and chocolate are admissible only with the dainty, æsthetic varieties, in which fruit or some kind of sweetmeat is used.

    Salads, Sandwiches and Chafing-Dish Dainties With Fifty Illustrations of Original Dishes

Comments

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  • Accidentally read about sweetbread on Wikipedia. Read that it should not be confused with sweetmeat. Both these words confuse/disgust me now. In a good way.

    May 12, 2012