Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A thin smooth shiny coating.
  • noun A thin glassy coating of ice.
  • noun A coating of colored, opaque, or transparent material applied to ceramics before firing.
  • noun A coating, as of syrup, applied to food.
  • noun A transparent coating applied to the surface of a painting to modify the color tones.
  • noun A glassy film, as one over the eyes.
  • intransitive verb To fit, furnish, or secure with glass.
  • intransitive verb To apply a glaze to.
  • intransitive verb To coat or cover thinly with ice.
  • intransitive verb To give a smooth lustrous surface to.
  • intransitive verb To be or become glazed or glassy.
  • intransitive verb To form a glaze.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Stock evaporated to a thin paste by boiling, and applied to meats to give them a polished surface.
  • noun A surface coating or sheet of ice.
  • noun A vitrifiable substance applied to the surface of fine pottery, stoneware, and porcelain.
  • noun A bright polish or glazed appearance on any surface.
  • noun In oil-painting, a thin layer of transparent color spread over a painted surface.
  • To place or fasten glass in; furnish or set with glass, as a window, case, frame, or the like; cover with glass, as a picture.
  • To cover, incrust, or overlay with something resembling glass in appearance or effect; cover with a shining vitreous or glairy substance; hence, to make glossy or glass-like in appearance: as, to glaze earthenware; to glaze, pastry, cloth, or paper.
  • Specifically, in oil-painting, to cover, as a picture or parts of a picture, with a thin coat of transparent color to modify the tone.
  • . To cause to shine; polish.
  • I. To shine; be brilliant.
  • To assume a dim glassy luster; become overspread with a semi-transparent film.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To furnish (a window, a house, a sash, a case, etc.) with glass.
  • transitive verb To incrust, cover, or overlay with a thin surface, consisting of, or resembling, glass; ; hence, to render smooth, glasslike, or glossy.
  • transitive verb (Paint.) To apply thinly a transparent or semitransparent color to (another color), to modify the effect.
  • transitive verb (Cookery) To cover (a donut, cupcake, meat, etc.) with a thin layer of edible syrup, or other substance which may solidify to a glossy coating. The material used for glazing is usually sweet or highly flavored.
  • noun The vitreous coating of pottery or porcelain; anything used as a coating or color in glazing. See glaze, v. t., 3.
  • noun (Cookery) Broth reduced by boiling to a gelatinous paste, and spread thinly over braised dishes.
  • noun A glazing oven. See Glost oven.
  • intransitive verb To become glazed of glassy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun ceramics The vitreous coating of pottery or porcelain; anything used as a coating or color in glazing. See glaze (transitive verb).
  • noun A transparent or semi-transparent layer of paint.
  • noun meteorology A smooth coating of ice formed on objects due to the freezing of rain; glaze ice
  • noun Broth reduced by boiling to a gelatinous paste, and spread thinly over braised dishes.
  • noun A glazing oven. See Glost oven.
  • verb transitive To install windows
  • verb intransitive To become glazed or glassy.
  • verb transitive In painting, to apply a thin, transparent layer of coating.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb coat with something sweet, such as a hard sugar glaze
  • noun any of various thin shiny (savory or sweet) coatings applied to foods
  • noun a glossy finish on a fabric
  • verb furnish with glass
  • verb coat with a glaze
  • noun a coating for ceramics, metal, etc.
  • verb become glassy or take on a glass-like appearance

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From Middle English glasen, from glas, glass, from Old English glæs; see ghel- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English glær ("amber").(Can we verify(+) this etymology?)

Examples

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