Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A mixture, such as plaster or roughcast, used to coat walls and line chimneys.
  • noun Ornamental work in plaster.
  • noun A cement mixture used to waterproof outer walls.
  • transitive verb To cover or adorn with parget.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To cover with parget or plaster; ornament with pargeting.
  • To paint; cover or daub with paint.
  • Hence To gloss over; disguise.
  • To cover something with parget or plaster.
  • To lay on paint.
  • noun Gypsum or plaster-stone.
  • noun Plaster; specifically, a kind of mortar formed of lime, hair, and cow-dung.
  • noun Plaster-work; especially, a more or less ornamental facing for exterior walls, decorated with figures in relief or sunk in the surface; pargeting.
  • noun Paint, especially paint for the face.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To lay on plaster.
  • intransitive verb obsolete To paint, as the face.
  • noun Gypsum or plaster stone.
  • noun Plaster, as for lining the interior of flues, or for stuccowork.
  • noun obsolete Paint, especially for the face.
  • transitive verb To coat with parget; to plaster, as walls, or the interior of flues.
  • transitive verb obsolete To paint; to cover over.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Gypsum or plaster stone.
  • noun Plaster, as for lining the interior of flues, or for stuccowork.
  • noun obsolete Paint, especially for the face.
  • verb To coat with parget; to plaster, as walls, or the interior of flues; as, to parget the outside of their houses.
  • verb obsolete To paint; to cover over.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb apply ornamental plaster to
  • noun plaster used to coat outer walls and line chimneys

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, probably from pargetten, to parget, from Old French pargeter, parjeter, to throw about (par-, intensive pref. from Latin per; see per in Indo-European roots + jeter, to throw, from Latin iactāre, frequentative of iacere; see yē- in Indo-European roots) and from Old French porgeter, to roughcast a wall (por-, forward ultimately from Latin porrō; see per in Indo-European roots + iactāre, to throw).]

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