Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of or relating to electromagnetic radiation between violet visible light and x-rays in the electromagnetic spectrum, having frequencies between 790 terahertz and 30 petahertz and wavelengths between 380 nanometers and 10 nanometers.
  • adjective Of or relating to a light bulb that emits ultraviolet radiation.
  • noun The ultraviolet range of electromagnetic radiation.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Beyond the violet: used of the invisible rays of the spectrum which are more refrangible than the violet, and consequently lie beyond them. See spectrum.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective (Physics) Lying outside the visible spectrum at its blue-violet end; -- said of light more refrangible (i. e. having a shorter wavelength) than the extreme violet rays of the visible spectrum. Electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths shorter than those of ultrviolet light are not usually considered as light waves, but are classified differently. The ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum is generally considered as comprising those electromagnetic emissions with wavelengths lying between those of visible light and those of X-rays, i. e. between 4000 Angstroms and 100 Angstroms.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective of electromagnetic radiation beyond (higher in frequency than) light visible to the human eye; radiation with wavelengths from 380 nanometre - 10 nanometre
  • noun Ultraviolet colour.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective having or employing wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; lying outside the visible spectrum at its violet end
  • noun radiation lying in the ultraviolet range; wave lengths shorter than light but longer than X rays

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

ultra- +‎ violet

Examples

  • The Restore Clean Water System from HoMedics claims that its built-in ultraviolet lights will kill 99. 9999% of bacteria, 99.99% of viruses and 99.95% of microbial cysts in your drinking water.

    A UV Water Pitcher Kills 99.999% of Germs in Drinking Water | Impact Lab

  • Paget, investigated the significance of a green fluorescence visible in ultraviolet light which pointed to adrenaline in the presence of O2, and alkali, and found that this appears to a high degree specific for adrenaline.

    Otto Loewi - Nobel Lecture

  • The band from 0.1 to 0.4 micrometers is called ultraviolet radiation.

    Electromagnetic radiation

  • The ultraviolet “rays” are not visible; thus it is incorrect to call ultraviolet energy ultraviolet “light.”

    The New Super-Nutrition

  • The ultraviolet “rays” are not visible; thus it is incorrect to call ultraviolet energy ultraviolet “light.”

    The New Super-Nutrition

  • "Glass is almost perfectly opaque to deep ultraviolet, which is why it's hard to get a tan through a window," e-mails physicist

    The Globe and Mail - Technology RSS feed

  • It's that pesky, invisible specter called ultraviolet light.

    HowStuffWorks Daily Feed

  • It's that pesky, invisible specter called ultraviolet light.

    HowStuffWorks Daily Feed

  • Ultraviolet light, also called ultraviolet radiation or UV, is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between x-rays and visibility light.

    eHow - Health How To's

  • "Glass is almost perfectly opaque to deep ultraviolet, which is why it's hard to get a tan through a window," e-mails physicist

    The Globe and Mail - Home RSS feed

Comments

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  • "An illustration of how ultraviolet appears is provided by the Impressionist painter Claude Monet. Following cataract surgery in 1923, his colour palette changed significantly; after the operation he painted water lilies with more blue than before. This may be because after lens removal he could see ultraviolet light, which would have given a blue cast to the world."

    -- http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2002/may/30/medicalscience.research

    April 24, 2013

  • Adds a entire new meaning to rose-colored cataracts. It is plum crazy as plumbago. Way-to-glow!

    April 25, 2013