Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of various small brownish songbirds of the family Troglodytidae, having rounded wings, a slender bill, and a short, often erect tail.
  • n. Any of various similar unrelated songbirds.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Members of a mainly New World passerine bird family Troglodytidae.
  • n. Small bird of similar appearance to a true wren.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any one of numerous species of small singing birds belonging to Troglodytes and numerous allied of the family Troglodytidæ.
  • n. Any one of numerous species of small singing birds more or less resembling the true wrens in size and habits.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A very small migratory and insectivorous singing-bird of Great Britain and other European countries, with a slender bill and extremely short tail, and of dark reddish-brown coloration varied with black, inhabiting shrubbery, and belonging to the family Troglodytidæ; hence, any member of this family, and, with a qualifying term, one of various other small birds of different families, as certain warblers, kinglets, etc. See the phrases below.
  • n. The goldcrest or kinglet, Regulus cristatus. See cut under goldcrest.
  • n. Uropsila leucogastra, of Oaxaca and Tamaulipas in Mexico, originally described by J. Gould in 1836 as Troglodytes leucogastra, a name subsequently misused to denote the white-bellied wren .
  • n. (See also cactus-wren, cañon-wren, marsh-wren, reed-wren, tule-wren, willow-wren, wood-wren.)

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. English architect who designed more than fifty London churches (1632-1723)
  • n. any of several small active brown birds of the northern hemisphere with short upright tails; they feed on insects

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English wrenne, from Old English wrenna.

Examples

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