Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • suffix Used to form the past tense of regular verbs: tasted.
  • suffix Used to form the past participle of regular verbs: absorbed.
  • suffix Having; characterized by; resembling: blackhearted.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • suffix Used to form past tenses of (regular) verbs. In linguistics, it is used for the base form of any past form. See -t for a variant.
  • suffix Used to form past participles of (regular) verbs. See -en and -t for variants.
  • suffix Used to form adjectives from nouns, in the sense of having the object represented by the noun.
  • suffix As an extension of the above, when used along with an adjective preceding the noun, describes something that has an object of a particular quality.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The termination of the past participle of regular, or weak, verbs; also, of analogous participial adjectives from nouns

Etymologies

Middle English -ede, from Old English -ade, -ede, -ode.
Middle English, from Old English -ad, -ed, -od.
Middle English -ede, -de, from Old English -ed, -od.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English -ode, -odon ("class 2 weak past"), from Proto-Germanic *-ōd-, *-ōdēd-. (Wiktionary)
From Old English -od ("class 2 weak past participle"), from Proto-Germanic *-ōdaz. (Wiktionary)
From Old English -od ("adjective suffix"), from Proto-Germanic *-ōdaz. While identical in appearance to the past participle of class 2 weak verbs, this suffix was attached directly to nouns without any intervening verb. Compare also Latin -ātus. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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