Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To put into code or cipher.
  • transitive v. Computer Science To alter (a file, for example) using a secret code so as to be unintelligible to unauthorized parties.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To conceal information by means of a code or cipher.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. to convert ordinary language into code; to hide the meaning of a message by converting it into a form that cannot be interpreted without knowing the secret method for interpretation, called the key.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. convert ordinary language into code

Etymologies

en-1 + (de)crypt.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The term encrypt t1; t2 represents t1 encrypted with t2 and is usually written as ft1 gt2.

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  • On the "Tools" menu in Microsoft Outlook, for example, "encrypt" is an option.

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  • My Actiontec DSL router is set with WPA2 -- for some reason the printer insists that the password encrypt is TKIP when it is actually AES.

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  • Yahoo Messenger 6 used a spectacularly complicated password obfuscation method to "encrypt" the password as it was being sent over the wire to Yahoo's servers.

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  • One catch only: as it is not a signal carrying info but just power, no way to "encrypt" it while receiver technology is trivial ....

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  • There are software products that will put your e-mail messages in secret code ( "encrypt") so that they cannot be read by anyone but the intended recipient.

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  • You can control whether a connection encrypts all data to and from the server after login using the 'encrypt' connection property.

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  • With some hesitation, she described how two people with identical copies of a book could use page numbers, line numbers, and even specific word numbers to encrypt and decode messages.

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  • He was worried, however, about the CIA discovering that he was going off the reservation by communicating directly with the IAEA and he suggested that they adopt a code to encrypt future communications.

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  • At Corning, Mr. Meadows has to pick and choose among Android devices to determine which ones can safely run on the company's corporate network—looking for phones that can encrypt data, enforce password requirements and allow the phone to be erased remotely.

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