Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A small dioecious tropical American tree (Chlorophora tinctoria) having wood that yields a yellow dyestuff.
  • n. The wood of this plant.
  • n. A dyestuff obtained from the wood of this plant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A tropical American tree, Maclura tinctoria, whose wood produces a yellow dye.
  • n. A European tree, Eurasian smoketree, Cotinus coggygria, whose wood produces an orange dye.
  • n. The wood of these trees.
  • n. A yellow dye obtained from the wood of these trees.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The wood of the Maclura tinctoria, a tree growing in the West Indies, used in dyeing yellow; -- called also old fustic.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dyestuff, the product of Chlorophora (Maclura) tinctoria, a large urticaceous tree of the West Indies and tropical South America.

Etymologies

Middle English fustik, from Old French fustoc, from Arabic fustuq, from Greek pistakē, pistachio; see pistachio.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English, fustik; derived from Old French, fustoc; derived from Arabic, فستق (fustuq, "pistachio"); derived from Persian, فستق (fustuq, "pistachio"). (Wiktionary)

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  • (n): any of various West Indian trees whose wood, called fustic, yields a yellow dye of the same name. Thus, the name might apply to the tree, wood, or dye produced therefrom.

    January 11, 2009

  • "...two Port Royal sugar ships whose slowness had separated them from their convoy in the night, and three other West Indiamen with even more valuable cargoes of indigo, coffee, logwood, ebony, old fustic and hides that, being fast sailers, had chanced it on their own..."
    --Patrick O'Brian, The Reverse of the Medal, 71

    A Sea of Words: A yellow dye extracted from the wood of Chlorophora tinctoria, a tree native to America and the West Indies. (206)

    February 29, 2008