Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A spiny tropical American tree (Haematoxylon campechianum) in the pea family, having dark heartwood from which a dyestuff is obtained.
  • n. The heartwood of this tree.
  • n. The purplish-red dye obtained from the heartwood of this tree.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A tree, Haematoxylum campechianum, in the legume family, of great economic importance and growing throughout Central America.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The heartwood of a tree (Hæmatoxylon Campechianum), a native of South America, It is a red, heavy wood, containing a crystalline substance called hæmatoxylin, and is used largely in dyeing. An extract from this wood is used in medicine as an astringent. Also called Campeachy wood, and bloodwood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A tree, Hæmatoxylon Campechianum, found in many parts of the West Indies, where it has been introduced from the adjoining continent, especially from Honduras, on which account it has been called Campeachy wood.
  • n. The wood of this tree.
  • n. The bluewood, Condalia obovata.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. spiny shrub or small tree of Central America and West Indies having bipinnate leaves and racemes of small bright yellow flowers and yielding a hard brown or brownish-red heartwood used in preparing a black dye
  • n. very hard brown to brownish-red heartwood of a logwood tree; used in preparing a purplish red dye

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • All this from a little tree simply called logwood.

    Bob Schulman: The Treasures of Campeche

  • The history of land-use can be inferred through the presence in the woodlands of trees such as logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum) produced from Central America in the 18th century.

    Leeward Islands dry forests

  • Some dye-stuffs, such as logwood for blacks, work best when the wool is mordanted with chromic acid, which is effected when sulphuric acid is the assistant mordant.

    The Dyeing of Woollen Fabrics

  • Most of the natural colouring matters, such as logwood and fustic, belong to another group of dye-stuffs.

    The Dyeing of Woollen Fabrics

  • It can be detected by the so-called "logwood" test, which is prepared and used as follows:

    The Home Medical Library, Volume V (of VI)

  • Another black ink not durable, however, is "logwood;" its extract is combined with a little chromate of potassium and boiled together in water.

    Forty Centuries of Ink

  • Timber, hemp, guano, hides, bones, with dye and tan materials; such as logwood, indigo, valonia, are either consumed here, or contribute little to the bulk of our exports.

    The Coal Question~ Of the Export and Import of Coal

  • We got into our boat again and glided along the shores, on one side low and marshy, with great trees lying in the water; on the other also low, but thickly wooded and with valuable timber, such as logwood and ebony, together with cedars, India-rubber trees, limes, lemons, etc.

    Life in Mexico, During a Residence of Two Years in That Country

  • We got into our boat again and glided along the shores, on one side low and marshy, with great trees lying in the water; on the other also low, but thickly wooded and with valuable timber, such as logwood and ebony, together with cedars,

    Life in Mexico

  • Back in Campeche, as the Spanish renamed the city, fortunes were made by everyone from the logwood forests' new owners to the slave brokers who imported laborers to cut the trees.

    Bob Schulman: The Treasures of Campeche

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