Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act of swallowing greedily or immoderately; that which is so swallowed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of swallowing greedily or immoderately; that which is so swallowed.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of swallowing greedily or in great quantity.
  • n. That which is thus swallowed.

Etymologies

Latin ingurgitatio: compare French ingurgitation. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • So it is written of Epicurus, that after his disease was judged desperate, he drowned his stomach and senses with a large draught and ingurgitation of wine; whereupon the epigram was made,

    The Advancement of Learning

  • As Sir Thomas Elyot wrote in the 16th century (using, you will observe, the very word of Mr HamertonÂ’s energetic but fed-up tradesman), ‘Inconveniences always doe happen by ingurgitation and excessive feedings.

    I. Introductory

  • As Sir Thomas Elyot wrote in the 16th century (using, you will observe, the very word of Mr Hamerton's energetic but fed-up tradesman), 'Inconveniences always doe happen by ingurgitation and excessive feedings.'

    On The Art of Reading

  • And as the frequent repetition of this great and unnatural stimulus of fermented liquors produces a permanent debility, or disobedience of the system to the usual and natural kinds and quantities of stimulus, as occurs in those who have long been addicted to the ingurgitation of fermented liquors.

    The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society A Poem, with Philosophical Notes

  • His countenance was pale, and towards the end of his life he suffered much from ulcers on his legs, and died about sixty, of general debility; like many others, who live intemperately in respect to the ingurgitation of fermented or spirituous liquors.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • And lastly, the sickness and vomiting induced by large potations of wine, or opium, does not occur till next day in some people, in none till some time after their ingurgitation.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • The kidney is nevertheless inflamed more frequently, though in a less degree, from other causes; especially from the intemperate ingurgitation of ale, or other fermented or spirituous liquors.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Debilitated people, who have been unfortunately accustomed to great ingurgitation of spirituous potation, frequently part with a great quantity of water during the night, but with not more than usual in the day-time.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • From the ingurgitation of spirituous liquors into the stomach and duodenum, the termination of the common bile-duct in that bowel becomes stimulated into unnatural action, and a greater quantity of bile is produced from all the secretory vessels of the liver, by the association of their motions with those of their excretory ducts; as has been explained in

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • If this idle ingurgitation of too much vinous spirit be daily practised, the urinary branch of absorbents at length gains an habit of inverting its motions, whenever the lacteals are much stimulated; and the whole or a great part of the chyle is thus daily carried to the bladder without entering the circulation, and the body becomes emaciated.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

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