Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. peaceful, calm
  • n. A low fellow.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A low fellow.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Calm; low and sheltered; still; serene; tranquil: as, a lown place.
  • n. A variant of loon.

Etymologies

From Old Norse logn, lygn. (Wiktionary)
See loon. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Kitteh is wishin hiz lown wuz emo so it kan kut itslf.

    INVISIBLE LAWNMOWER - Lolcats 'n' Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?

  • The usual figure of a Sky boy, is a lown with bare legs and feet, a dirty kilt, ragged coat and waistcoat, a bare head, and a stick in his hand, which, I suppose, is partly to help the lazy rogue to walk, partly to serve as a kind of a defensive weapon.

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • I would be unhappy; and I don't think I'll be loaning him the lown mower again.

    Archive 2005-08-01

  • We should have both lord and lown, if the peevish baggage would but give way to customers.

    Pericles, Prince of Tyre

  • That sounded harmless enough; she settled lown to enjoy her dinner.

    The Course Of True Love

  • She was hull-lown but I could see her tops'ls, sir.

    Hornblower And The Hotspur

  • "Why," he exclaimed, in a lowered voice, "that lown tore your pretty shirtwaist!"

    Mountain Blood A Novel

  • We should have both lord and lown if the peevish baggage would but give way to customers.

    Act IV. Scene VI. Pericles, Prince of Tyre

  • About the end o 'July there cam' a spell o 'weather, the like o't never was in that countryside; it was lown an' het an 'heartless; the herds couldnae win up the Black Hill, the bairns were ower weariet to play; an' yet it was gousty too, wi 'claps o' het wund that rummled in the glens, and bits o 'shouers that slockened naething.

    Masterpieces of Mystery, Vol. 1 (of 4) Ghost Stories

  • The usual figure of a Sky-boy, is a lown with bare legs and feet, a dirty kilt, ragged coat and waistcoat, a bare head, and a stick in his hand, which, I suppose, is partly to help the lazy rogue to walk, partly to serve as a kind of a defensive weapon.

    Life of Johnson

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