Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. carrying or bearing eggs.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Bearing eggs; oviferous.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Bearing ova or eggs; oviferous.

Etymologies

Latin ovum: egg + -gerous. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I must give one instance; he throws doubts and sneers at my saying that the ovigerous frena of cirripedes have been converted into branchiæ, because I have not found them to be branchiæ; whereas _he himself_ admits, before I wrote on cirripedes, without the least hesitation, that their organs are branchiæ.

    Alfred Russel Wallace: Letters and Reminiscences, Vol. 1

  • I must give one instance; he throws doubts and sneers at my saying that the ovigerous frena of cirripedes have been converted into branchiae, because I have not found them to be branchiae; whereas he himself admits, before I wrote on cirripedes, without the least hesitation, that their organs are branchiae.

    Alfred Russel Wallace Letters and Reminiscences

  • The ovigerous frena of certain cirripedes, which have ceased to give attachment to the ova and are feebly developed, are nascent branchiæ.

    XIV. Mutual Affinities of Organic Beings: Morphology-Embryology-Rudimentary Organs. Rudimentary, Atrophied, and Aborted Organs

  • Now I think no one will dispute that the ovigerous frena in the one family are strictly homologous with the branchiæ of the other family; indeed, they graduate into each other.

    VI. Difficulties of the Theory. Modes of Transition

  • The Balanidæ or sessile cirripedes, on the other hand, have no ovigerous frena, the eggs lying loose at the bottom of the sack, within the well-enclosed shell; but they have, in the same relative position with the frena, large, much-folded membranes, which freely communicate with the circulatory lacunæ of the sack and body, and which have been considered by all naturalists to act as branchiæ.

    VI. Difficulties of the Theory. Modes of Transition

  • Therefore it need not be doubted that the two little folds of skin, which originally served as ovigerous frena, but which, likewise, very slightly aided in the act of respiration, have been gradually converted by natural selection into branchiæ simply through an increase in their size and the obliteration of their adhesive glands.

    VI. Difficulties of the Theory. Modes of Transition

  • Pedunculated cirripedes have two minute folds of skin, called by me the ovigerous frena, which serve, through the means of a sticky secretion, to retain the eggs until they are hatched within the sack.

    On the Origin of Species~ Chapter 06 (historical)

  • The Balanidae or sessile cirripedes, on the other hand, have no ovigerous frena, the eggs lying loose at the bottom of the sack, in the well-enclosed shell; but they have large folded branchiae.

    On the Origin of Species~ Chapter 06 (historical)

  • Now I think no one will dispute that the ovigerous frena in the one family are strictly homologous with the branchiae of the other family; indeed, they graduate into each other.

    On the Origin of Species~ Chapter 06 (historical)

  • Therefore I do not doubt that little folds of skin, which originally served as ovigerous frena, but which, likewise, very slightly aided the act of respiration, have been gradually converted by natural selection into branchiae, simply through an increase in their size and the obliteration of their adhesive glands.

    On the Origin of Species~ Chapter 06 (historical)

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Comments

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  • Wants to look like over-generous.

    November 8, 2009

  • "bearing eggs or modified for the purpose of bearing them" --Merriam-Webster's Unabridged Dictionary

    November 8, 2009