Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The official residence of a royal personage.
  • n. Chiefly British The official residence of a high dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop.
  • n. A large or splendid residence.
  • n. A large, often gaudily ornate building used for entertainment or exhibitions.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Official residence of a head of state or other dignitary, especially in a monarchical or imperial governmental system.
  • n. A large and lavishly ornate residence.
  • n. A large, ornate public building used for entertainment or exhibitions.
  • v. To decorate or ornate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The residence of a sovereign, including the lodgings of high officers of state, and rooms for business, as well as halls for ceremony and reception.
  • n. The official residence of a bishop or other distinguished personage.
  • n. Loosely, any unusually magnificent or stately house.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The house in which an emperor, a king or queen, a bishop, or other exalted personage lives: as, an imperial palace; a royal palace; a pontifical palace; a ducal palace.
  • n.
  • n. A magnificent, grand, or stately dwelling-place; a magnificent mansion or building.
  • n. An inclosed place: a yard; a landing-place inclosed by pales (see palise) or walls.
  • n. A cellar for the storing of fish.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a large ornate exhibition hall
  • n. official residence of an exalted person (as a sovereign)
  • n. the governing group of a kingdom
  • n. a large and stately mansion

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French palais, from Palātium, Palatine Hill, Rome (from its being the site where emperors built their homes), imperial residence.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English, from Old French palais, which comes from Latin palātium, from Palātium, in reference to the Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills of Rome, where the aristocracy of the Roman Republic and—later, Roman emperors—built large, splendid residences. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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