Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The rootstock of the brake, Pteris aquilina, var. esculenta, which when roasted was formerly a staple article of food with the aborigines of New Zealand.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (corporate finance) the amount, expressed as a percentage, that is earned on a company's total capital calculated by dividing the total capital into earnings before interest, taxes, or dividends are paid

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Weakly subservient to the church, and dispossessing himself of his revenues to such an extent that he was forced to beg a small pittance for his daily necessities from his churchly despoilers, it was said of him that "_Onc ne fut roi comme ce roi_."

    The Counts of Gruyère

  • I hope it will be ever said of him, _Le roi est mort_, -- _vive le roi_!

    The Gypsies

  • Formerly, after the death of the kings of France, the _grand maitre_ (master of the household) broke his wand of office over the grave, saying aloud three times, _le roi est mort_ and then _Vive le roi_.

    The Love-Tiff

  • Brown still sits on the throne, but he is what the French call a roi fainéant: king in name only.

    Gordon Brown, Charlie Whelan and Me

  • We gathered another four recruits, professional caravan guards from a nomad tribe called the roi, who deserted to join us.

    Shadow Games

  • I learned from a well-informed person that the sum of one hundred thousand francs from the private funds of the Emperor was distributed by M. Dequevauvilliers, secretary of the treasury of the chamber, among the authors of the poetry sent to the Tuileries; and finally, fashion, which makes use of the least events, invented stuffs called roi-de-Rome, as in the old regime they had been called dauphin.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Collection of Memoirs of Napoleon

  • I learned from a well - informed person that the sum of one hundred thousand francs from the private funds of the Emperor was distributed by M. Dequevauvilliers, secretary of the treasury of the chamber, among the authors of the poetry sent to the Tuileries; and finally, fashion, which makes use of the least events, invented stuffs called roi-de-Rome, as in the old regime they had been called dauphin.

    Recollections of the private life of Napoleon

  • Such far-fetched stories are part of what scholar James Serpell calls the roi s'amuse tradition of pet tales:

    NPR Topics: News

  • Although corduroy's origins are up for debate — most say it was invented in Manchester, England in the 18th century, but some believe the name is derived from the French corde du roi, meaning "king's cord" — corduroy has maintained a cult following amongst writers throughout history.

    Wale Watch

  • This is no Bonaparte, but a roi faineant, paraded at the head of an army he has no capacity to lead.

    Stromata Blog

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