Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A wooden shoe worn in some European countries.
  • n. A sandal or shoe having a band of leather or other material across the instep.
  • n. A lightweight carrier in which a projectile of a smaller caliber is centered so as to permit firing the projectile within a larger-caliber weapon. The carrier fills the bore of the weapon from which the projectile is fired; it is normally discarded a short distance from the muzzle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A wooden shoe.
  • n. A carrier around projectile(s) in firearms, cannons and artillery which holds the projectile in precision within the barrel

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of wooden shoe worn by the peasantry in France, Belgium, Sweden, and some other European countries.
  • n. A thick, circular disk of wood, to which the cartridge bag and projectile are attached, in fixed ammunition for cannon; also, a piece of soft metal attached to a projectile to take the groove of the rifling.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A wooden shoe, made of one piece hollowed out by boring-tools and scrapers, worn by the peasantry in France, Belgium, etc.
  • n. In parts of France, a sort of shoe consisting of a thick wooden sole with sides and top of coarse leather; a sort of clog worn in wet weather.
  • n. A thick circular wooden disk to which a projectile is attached so as to maintain its proper position in the bore of a gun; also, a metallic cup or disk fixed to the bottom of an elongated projectile so as to fill the bore and take the rifling when the gun is discharged.
  • n. A pointed iron shoe used to protect the end of a file.
  • n. In harp-making, one of the little disks with projecting pins by which a string is shortened when a pedal is depressed.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a shoe carved from a single block of wood
  • n. footwear usually with wooden soles

Etymologies

French, from Old French çabot, alteration of savate, old shoe, probably of Turkish or Arabic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French sabot. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The green sabot is thicker and makes up the .06 left over by using the small diameter bullet.

    Muzzleloading

  • Hornady .429 Diameter 265 grain soft point with a T/C Magnum sabot is flat out awesome!

    Anybody have any exp. with the Hornaday SST Muzzleloader bullets ? I've DUMPED the "powerbelt" because of "lost" deer.

  • Those who know that one meaning of sabot is “a wooden shoe” will probably admire desabotage, from Bill Parks, of Covington, Va.

    Word Fugitives

  • From the word sabot, comes the verb saboter: "to bungle," literally, "to walk noisily": with it, the reminder to no longer stomp, but to tiptoe past the Gallic culture that still whispers out from every French nook and cranny, to travel forward--light on my feet--so as not to "sabotage" this French experience.

    French Word-A-Day:

  • Then we discover that outside of Teutonic countries no one celebrates Christmas by the giving of presents and that in Holland, instead of the stocking, the child's wooden sabot is used for the Christmas presents.

    How To Make A Christmas Speech

  • From the word sabot, comes the verb saboter: "to bungle," literally, "to walk noisily": with it, the reminder to no longer stomp, but to tiptoe past the Gallic culture that still whispers out from every French nook and cranny, to travel forward -- light on my feet -- so as not to "sabotage" this French experience.

    French Word-A-Day:

  • IDS stands for "Impact Discarding Sabot": The back end of the slug fits into the attached one-piece sabot, which is essentially a wad that encases the rear of the projectile.

    Slugfest 2003

  • "But we knew you were involved '" Please, the sabot was a calling card.

    The Third Victim

  • The sabot was a wooden disk about the same diameter as the shot.

    Artillery Through the Ages A Short Illustrated History of Cannon, Emphasizing Types Used in America

  • For firing, it is surrounded by a two halves of a lightweight plastic and metal jacket called a sabot, which falls away after the projectile emerges from the muzzle of the gun.

    Citizendium, the Citizens' Compendium - Recent changes [en]

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Comments

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  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • "A girl wearing sabots clip-clopped across the asphalt roadway, and next to the streetcar barn four or five kids were throwing rocks at a line of empty cans."

    Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami, translated by Jay Rubin, p 64

    September 9, 2010

  • Etymologically, patience is but suffering
    with calmness. So perhaps that means
    that passion is but suffering with gusto...

    October 15, 2007

  • According to legend, in the early days of
    the industrial revolution, workers in a
    weaving factory took off their wooden clogs -- sabots -- and threw them into
    the machinery, with destructive intent,
    as a protest that the machines were degrading the nature of their work...

    Hence the word sabotage.

    October 15, 2007