sedative-hypnotic love

sedative-hypnotic

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A drug, such as a barbiturate or antianxiety agent, that depresses the activity of the central nervous system and is used to relieve anxiety and induce sleep.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a sedative that depresses activity of the central nervous system and reduces anxiety and induces sleep

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This may include an opiate and sedative-hypnotic abstinence syndrome once the combination is discontinued.

    Loads

  • Benzodiazepines, sedative-hypnotic drugs that include Xanax and Valium 929 deaths.

    Sunday's editorial pages

  • Food and Drug Administration last year to require that Ambien, Lunesta and other "sedative-hypnotic" drugs carry strong warnings.

    To Cut Risks of Sleeping Pills,

  • In May, an FDA panel recommended approval of fospropofol disodium, a sedative-hypnotic agent for use in patients undergoing diagnostic or therapeutic procedures such as colonoscopies, but panel members stressed they would like to see more data on how the drug will affect older and obese people.

    Eisai's Proposed Sedative Gets

  • Eisai is seeking FDA approval of fospropofol disodium, a sedative-hypnotic agent for use in patients undergoing diagnostic or therapeutic procedures such as colonoscopies.

    FDA Panel Backs Eisai

  • In May, an FDA panel of experts recommended approval of fospropofol disodium, a sedative-hypnotic agent for use in patients undergoing diagnostic or therapeutic procedures such as colonoscopies, but panel members stressed they would like to see more data on how the drug will affect older and obese people.

    Eisai to Try Again For FDA Approval

  • When we say sedative-hypnotic, it helps you go to sleep quickly.

    CNN Transcript Mar 26, 2007

  • She hesitates, then jams a vial of amnestic mixed with a sedative-hypnotic into an empty hypo.

    No Limits

  • Once this reaction was over, both groups were given an injection of alcohol, and the sedative-hypnotic response was measured.

    Alcohol and The Addictive Brain

  • Part of the problem is that most of these drugs do not actually induce sleep - they induce a sedative-hypnotic state that is more like unconsciousness than true sleep.

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