Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Geology A chemical sediment or crust, as of porous silica, deposited by a mineral spring.
  • n. A mass formed by sintering.
  • transitive v. To cause (metallic powder, for example) to form a coherent mass by heating without melting.
  • intransitive v. To form a coherent mass by heating without melting.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An alluvial sediment deposited by a mineral spring.
  • n. A mass formed by sintering.
  • n. A mixture of iron ore and fluxes added to a blast furnace.
  • v. To compact and heat a powder to form a solid mass.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Dross, as of iron; the scale which files from iron when hammered; -- applied as a name to various minerals.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To compact or become compacted together by partial fusion, so as to resemble sinter. See sintering.
  • n. Silicious or calcareous matter deposited by springs.
  • n. An obsolete form of center.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cause (ores or powdery metals) to become a coherent mass by heating without melting

Etymologies

German, from Middle High German, dross, metal slag, from Old High German.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From German Sinter. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Where, however, the temperature is high, some part of the deposit, even a little gold, may be laid down just about the spring in the deposits known as sinter, which are often formed at such places.

    Outlines of the Earth's History A Popular Study in Physiography

  • The device is based on two image processing technologies developed by Apical Limited (Headquarters: London, United Kingdom, CEO: Dr. Michael Tusch): iridix, which implements pixel-by-pixel dynamic range compression, and sinter, which is an advanced noise reduction core.

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  • Because the TE3610PF uses 'sinter' noise reduction technology in addition to iridix, it reduces sensor noise prior to image compression and improves the efficiency of JPEG and

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  • A couple of years ago I did my very first reading at the Bauer Museum of Art. I'd written a short literary piece about my experiences working as a laborer in a sinter plant, and the theme of the new exhibit was Big Steel.

    INTERVIEW: Ted Kosmatka

  • Using microwaves to sinter a mold can get many shapes, whether flat plates, beams, or other structural elements.

    NAS Seeks Public Input on Space Goals - NASA Watch

  • Regardless of how you grow, spin, forge or sinter new space habitats there will be a need for large high-tech components from Earth built as stackable modules. keny

    Griffin - No Human Space Flight Review Needed - NASA Watch

  • The equally owned plant would use Kobe's ITmk3 technology, which dispenses with coke ovens, sinter plants and blast furnaces, and uses iron-ore fines and non-coking coal to produce iron nuggets.

    Steel Authority, Kobe Steel Plan $284 Million India Plant

  • Sparrows also has reactivated its sinter plant, which captures the iron out of waste products.

    Hanging On at Sparrows Point

  • I'd written a short literary piece about my experiences working as a laborer in a sinter plant, and the theme of the new exhibit was Big Steel.

    Keeping An Eye On... Ted Kosmatka

  • That's what I weighed back when I was a laborer in the sinter plant, and I was in good shape back then.

    Archive 2009-05-01

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Comments

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  • What a coincidence. I sintered some fruit salad for a party just last week.

    March 25, 2009

  • So, according to Weirdnet's second definition, the following sentence would be OK:

    The Count sintered some delicious blood pudding for the annual potluck of the Transylvanian nobility.

    March 24, 2009

  • "He felt closer to dust, he said, than to light, air or water. There was nothing he found so unbearable as a well-dusted house, and he never felt more at home than in places where things remained undisturbed, muted under the grey, velvety sinter left when matter dissolved, little by little, into nothingness."

    – W. G. Sebald, The Emigrants, tr. Michael Hulse (London: Vintage Books, 2002), 161.

    March 23, 2009