Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Informal In financial need: We are strapped for cash right now.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of strap.
  • adj. muscular
  • adj. armed, having a weapon
  • adj. poor

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The hunter made no comment about the bearskin strapped to it, for which Domar was thankful.

    Caribou House « A Fly in Amber

  • I've got her all excited about the sport, and use a dummy with a pheasant skin strapped to it for retrieving practice.

    What, where, and how is the best way to hunt pheasants without a dog. Thanks.

  • Then he looked over at Husband, who had Robin strapped to him.

    2008 April « A Bird’s Nest

  • The potential upside of waiting 12 or 14 hours a day, six or seven days a week, is the chance that one day Britney will roll her car into a ditch, or be taken away again strapped to a gurney.

    Shooting Britney

  • There appeared before them, at this juncture, going in the same direction as themselves, a traveller on foot, who, with a portmanteau strapped to his back, leaned upon a stout stick as he walked, and read from a book which he held in his other hand.

    The Old Curiosity Shop

  • You could wear a muu-muu that said "SUCK JESUS BALLS" on the front and a Carmen Miranda merkin strapped to your thighs and we'd all just shrug.

    Quick Notes From Origins

  • As he reached the foot of the slope, an elderly horseman, with his portmanteau strapped behind him, stopped his horse when Adam had passed him, and turned round to have another long look at the stalwart workman in paper cap, leather breeches, and dark-blue worsted stockings.

    Adam Bede

  • Hugh Axe carried the weapon from which he got his name strapped to his saddle.

    The Pillars of the Earth

  • The morning broke bright and mellow with the rays of the winter sun, which in Carolina lends the warmth of October to the chills of January, when, with my portmanteau strapped, and my thin overcoat on my arm, I gave my last "God bless you" to the octoroon woman, and turned my face toward home.

    Among the Pines or, South in Secession Time

  • The morning broke bright and mellow with the rays of the winter sun, which in Carolina lends the warmth of October to the chills of January, when, with my portmanteau strapped, and my thin overcoat on my arm, I gave my last 'God bless you' to the octoroon woman, and turned my face toward home.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 2, August, 1862 Devoted to Literature and National Policy

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.