Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Chiefly British The edible root of the beet.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A normally deep red coloured cultivar of the beet. A root vegetable usually cooked or pickled before eating.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. beet having a massively swollen red root; widely grown for human consumption
  • n. round red root vegetable

Etymologies

From beet + root. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Yes, while making a subzi of beetroot is common across Indian kitchens, I think the beet chop is a Bengali specialty.

    Weekend Herb Blogging: Red Beet

  • My recipe using beetroot is a yummy snack called beet chops.

    Weekend Herb Blogging: Red Beet

  • A man afflicted with a colour-blindness which leads him to turn out a portrait of me resplendent in beetroot hair and eyes of a vivid green cannot help himself.

    Marriage as a Trade

  • Heart n Soul, love the idea of beetroot and gherkin.

    Fennel Remoulade

  • Believe there is a vegetable called beetroot too, and wonder if the name cabbage is correct.

    Woman's Endurance

  • Indeed, within minutes he has decided that the beetroot will be the king of this dish, so we'll oven-cook and fondant this squash, pan-fry the beetroot, braise the wonderful chard and chop the apple.

    Evening Standard - Home

  • I still associate Sunday evenings with limp lettuce and beetroot, which is what we used to have when I was at boarding school.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • The by-product from a nearby factory processing their beetroot is a relatively cheap source of nutrients and a useful conditioner for their lighter soils.

    FWi - All News

  • Nice to see new recipe with beetroot which is good for health.

    Weekend Herb Blogging: Red Beet

  • The president has also been blasted at home and abroad for standing by his controversial health minister, who has advocated natural remedies such as beetroot and garlic over antiretroviral drugs for people with the AIDS virus.

    Messy Fight to Lead ANC

Comments

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  • ...and the beet goes on....
    ...root it on (and down)?...

    March 22, 2014

  • Oh, funny. I meant "herring," not "hearing." (I was also typing too fast--it's shocking I managed to avoid saying something about the "beats.")

    March 22, 2014

  • I think barbabietola, the Italian for beetroot, is a pretty cool word.

    April 7, 2011

  • My Latvian grandmother used to make a potato salad with pickled hearing, pickled beets, and... well... pickles. The Americans used to refer to it as "That Pink Potato Salad."

    April 4, 2011

  • yarb: gracias!

    October 2, 2008

  • I adore beetroot. My mother used to boil it with honey.

    Dontcry: estoy en acuerdo, mi cucarachita.

    October 2, 2008

  • I say and love beets. Safest to eat them naked and outside -- or with your face directly over the sink.

    I just say roach -- unless I'm saying it in Spanish then I say the whole thing 'cause it sounds almost like a term of endearment.

    October 2, 2008

  • Well, funny you should ask, pterodactyl: it's another word for f**k. In the sexual sense.

    October 2, 2008

  • So, what do root and rooting mean in Australia?

    *quite curious now*

    October 2, 2008

  • Heehee!

    October 2, 2008

  • When I was a little kid in B'more, I'd go around singing the Roto-Rooter jingle all the time. I had no idea what it would do to me.

    October 1, 2008

  • You guys aren't the only ones who laugh at RotoRooter! Of all the bizarre names....

    Also, before this company became a huge conglomerate, one of the "mergee" companies was named Roach Brothers Real Estate. I suspect they employed RotoRooter for certain property problems.

    October 1, 2008

  • Hehehe, classic. No worse than Lube Mobile, though.

    October 1, 2008

  • *** laughs like a really fat spider ***

    October 1, 2008

  • *** falls out of chair laughing ***

    October 1, 2008

  • Do they?! That's cute. :) I remember my Aussie friends practically falling out of their chairs laughing when I told them about this company in my home state. (P.S. For maximum effect, turn the sound on when you click that link.)

    I don't think your theory is shot to pieces re: toilet and ... stuff like that, though.

    October 1, 2008

  • Ah, my prudishness theory is indeed shot to pieces. Will abandon it forthwith, at least in the matter of beets. I had quite forgotten to make a connection with the fact that Aussies snicker whenever Americans talk about rooting for a sports team.

    October 1, 2008

  • Rolig, why do you think WeirdNet defines manroot without any mention of a massively swollen red root?

    p.s. did you mean lasciviousness, perchance?

    October 1, 2008

  • Mmmmmm, beets! I like 'em roasted, pickled, borschted, stewed with their tops.... And you can use them to make purple noodles.

    October 1, 2008

  • More evidence of Weirdnet's lasciousness: "having a massively swollen red root…" I think Weirdnet is plagiarizing gay porn.

    Edit: lasciviousness. (I'm typing too fast.)

    October 1, 2008

  • Hee... no, root does not have the same slangy meaning in the United States as it does in Australia... does it also in England/U.K.? (*thinks so but is not sure*) (*now wonders about that "massively swollen" up there in the WeirdNet definition*)

    Bilby, can't you buy them at the grocer? They are in supermarkets and grocery stores here. Hmm.

    October 1, 2008

  • Oooh, beet greens! If only I could get these *sighs* Oh well, plenty of other decent greens around.

    That anecdote and description of Recalcitrant Princess Frindley in her high chair has made my day :-)

    October 1, 2008

  • Americans don't use root the same way we do, do they? So it wouldn't be considered taboo?

    October 1, 2008

  • p.s. I've had it on burgers, too, reesetee! but it's not all that common in the U.S. it seems. :(

    October 1, 2008

  • That's an interesting theory, though, frindley, especially given the occasionally-traced-as-puritanical strains that continue to run through American culture... I would suggest another theory that might be partly responsible: Americans tend to shorten words a lot. (We're in such a hurry, you know. ;)) Maybe that's why roach and beet are slightly more common—again, if they even are more common.

    Also, Americans seem less likely than others to eat the greens of beets, making the distinction between beet and beetroot less important, because it's more likely when you're mentioning the vegetable at all, that you're talking about the root. (In my experience, when any other part or even purpose of the plant is referred to, it's precisely indicated: e.g. beet greens, sugarbeet.)

    Disclaimer, again: these are broad generalizations intended only to spur linguistic conversation and not ignite political/cultural flame-wars. Also, I love beet greens, but they don't love me.

    October 1, 2008

  • But only if your survey includes just me. ;-> Probably a regional thing.

    October 1, 2008

  • Just like I surmised: possibly erroneous.

    October 1, 2008

  • 1) I love beets (or beetroot). 2) I've had it on burgers. 3) I say cockroach and live in the United States.

    Just sayin'. :-)

    October 1, 2008

  • My mother liked beetroot way too much. Every week she'd be boiling some up in the pressure cooker. I couldn't stand it and refused to eat it. (Refused to eat anything it had even touched!) I was once left to sit in my high chair for quite some hours after lunch with a plateful of tomato and beetroot staring at me – these being the two salad vegetables I hated. By dinner time my mother realised there was no way I was ever going to eat them. In the end she indulged me because I would eat just about everything else, including baby prawns, which were very useful for keeping me amused while she unpacked the shopping.

    October 1, 2008

  • Then there's borscht.

    October 1, 2008

  • True. Actually, thinking of beet/beetroot always makes me think of roach/cockroach. I've long held the possibly erroneous and almost certainly unfair view that the use of the two shortened forms is a further sign of American prudishness, i.e. an unwillingness to use the words root and cock in polite company, along with the word toilet, which I have only just trained myself back into using in a unselfconscious way, two-and-a-half years after returning to Australia!

    October 1, 2008

  • My carpetwise mother wouldn't allow it in the house, so I had limited exposure to it as a kid.
    It's an important food in Russia because it stores so well through the long winter. I had plenty while I was there and it was okay, a bit too earthy on its own but just the thing in vinaigret salad.

    October 1, 2008

  • Oooh, frindley, your description is making me crave some of those sloppy bleeding vinegary slices right now...

    p.s. in the United States it isn't usually called beetroot, just beets. And it's never (that I know of) served on burgers. Which is a shame, really.

    October 1, 2008

  • I'm indifferent to beetroot. But I've never eaten it.

    October 1, 2008

  • My theory involves two factors:
    1. It's just so messy – all that crimson juice everywhere – and furthermore, it makes many people think of blood, so deep-set taboos probably come into play at the subconscious level.
    2. Because it is commonly prepared by pickling in vinegar, there will be many who don't care for or can't stand the taste. (I count as one of these people; the couple of times I have eaten raw beetroot, which is rather sweet, I haven't minded it so much.)

    Dried raw shredded beetroot manages to avoid both problems, but it's hardly ever served that way. Only in those sloppy, bleeding, vinegary slices that stain everything in the salad or burger with which they're served. A shame really.

    October 1, 2008

  • Why does it split people so? I have never come across anyone indifferent to beetroot.

    October 1, 2008