Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The use of microorganisms, such as bacteria or yeasts, or biological substances, such as enzymes, to perform specific industrial or manufacturing processes. Applications include the production of certain drugs, synthetic hormones, and bulk foodstuffs as well as the bioconversion of organic waste and the use of genetically altered bacteria in the cleanup of oil spills.
  • n. The application of the principles of engineering and technology to the life sciences; bioengineering.
  • n. See ergonomics.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the use of living organisms (especially microorganisms) in industrial, agricultural, medical and other technological applications
  • n. the application of the principles and practices of engineering and technology to the life sciences

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. same as bioengineering.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the branch of engineering science in which biological science is used to study the relation between workers and their environments
  • n. the branch of molecular biology that studies the use of microorganisms to perform specific industrial processes

Etymologies

bio- +‎ technology (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Expenditures on healthcare are driven by demand, which is spurred by income and by advances in biotechnology that make health interventions increasingly effective.

    Stromata Blog:

  • Increasing farm productivity through "unsustainable" methods like chemicals and biotechnology is actually more environmentally friendly becuase it frees up land for other uses.

    Environment-friendly Farming?, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • Big pharmaceutical companies have been particularly interested in biotechnology companies like Actelion, whose drugs are either already on the market or nearing approval and can therefore quickly generate revenue.

    Amid Sale Queries, Biotech Weighs Next Move

  • Use a variety of renewable feedstocks to replace oil and natural gas: Recent advances in biotechnology and chemistry mean we can create more chemicals from renewable resources like sugarcane, corn, cellulosic biomass and renewably-sourced syngas.

    A Balanced Diet For The Chemical Industry

  • The promise and danger of biotechnology is perhaps nowhere more obvious than the ways it affects people with disabilities and their families.

    Science

  • Today's ongoing revolutions in biotechnology-and-information technology see technological progress of at least 15% per year in industries that make up 13% of total production -- a direct leading-sector boost to economic growth of 2% per year.

    Lurching toward Utopia?, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • One of the ways we can improve exports and expand the benefits of biotechnology is to encourage countries to develop regulatory systems based on science, not politics.

    Jose W. Fernandez: Addressing Global Food Production

  • One way we can expand the benefits of biotechnology is to develop regulatory systems based on science, not politics.

    Jose W. Fernandez: Addressing Global Food Production

  • Hsien-Hsien Lei at Eye on DNA lists the most powerful women in biotechnology and healthcare

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • After all, nanotech involves rearranging not just DNA and the other building blocks of life — already a source of controversy in biotechnology — but the very atoms and molecules that make up all matter.

    God and Small Things - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com

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