Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The central forward portion of the lower jaw.
  • transitive v. To pull (oneself) up with the arms while grasping an overhead horizontal bar until the chin is level with the bar.
  • transitive v. Music To place (a violin) under the chin in preparation to play it.
  • intransitive v. To chin oneself.
  • intransitive v. Informal To make idle conversation; chatter.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The bottom of a face, especially, the lower jaw or the region below the mouth.
  • n. talk.
  • n. A falsehood.
  • n. The ability to withstand being punched in the face without being knocked out.
  • v. To talk.
  • v. To perform a chin-up.
  • v. To punch (someone)'s chin (part of the body).
  • n. a chinchilla.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The lower extremity of the face below the mouth; the point of the under jaw.
  • n. The exterior or under surface embraced between the branches of the lower jaw bone, in birds.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The lower extremity of the face below the mouth; the point of the under jaw in man, or a corresponding part in other animals.
  • n. In zoology, the mentum.
  • n. In Rotifera, a ciliated muscular part or process just below the mouth.
  • To talk.
  • To talk to, especially with assurance or impudence.
  • In gymnastics, to lift the weight of the body by the arms on a horizontal bar until the chin is brought over the bar. Also used transitively: as, to chin the bar.
  • An abbreviation of China;
  • Chinese.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. raise oneself while hanging from one's hands until one's chin is level with the support bar
  • n. the protruding part of the lower jaw
  • n. Kamarupan languages spoken in western Burma and Bangladesh and easternmost India

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English cin; see genu-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English chin, from Old English ċinn ("chin"), from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz (“chin”) (cf. West Frisian/Dutch kin, German Kinn), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenHw-, *ǵnā(w)- (“jaw”) (cf. Welsh gen, Latin gena, Tocharian A śanwem, Ancient Greek génys 'jaw', Persian چانه (čâne), Sanskrit hánus). (Wiktionary)
Shortening of chinchilla. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.