Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun One of the two forms of the 21st letter of the Hebrew alphabet, distinguished from the letter sin by having a dot above the right side of the letter.
  • noun The front part of the leg below the knee and above the ankle.
  • noun The shinbone.
  • noun A cut of meat from the lower foreleg of beef cattle.
  • intransitive verb To climb (a rope or pole, for example) by gripping and pulling alternately with the hands and legs.
  • intransitive verb To kick or hit in the shins.
  • intransitive verb To climb something by shinning it.
  • intransitive verb To move quickly on foot.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In a modern turning-plow, the lower front corner of the mold-board, next the share and forming part of the cutting edge. It replaces in part the head or sheath of old plows.
  • To use the shins in climbing; climb by hugging with arms and legs: with up: as, to shin up a tree.
  • To go afoot; walk: as, to shin along; to shin across the field.
  • To climb by grasping with the arms and legs and working or pulling one's self up: as, to shin a tree.
  • To kick on the shins.
  • noun The twenty-first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, corresponding in sound to the English sh. Its numerical value is 300.
  • noun The front part of the human leg from the knee to the ankle, along which the sharp edge of the shin-bone or tibia may be felt beneath the skin.
  • noun The shin-bone.
  • noun The lower leg; the shank: as, a shin of beef.
  • noun In ornithology, the hard or scaly part of the leg of a bird; the shank. See sharp-shinncd.
  • noun In entomology, the tibia, or fourth joint of the leg. Also called shank. See cut under coxa.
  • noun A fishplate.
  • noun An adapted pronunciation of the abbreviation sinh, used as a colloquial substitute for ‘hyperbolic sine.’
  • noun A god, or the gods collectively; spirit, or the spirits; with a capital, the term used by many Protestant missionaries in China, and universally among Protestant Christians in Japan, for the Supreme Being; God. (See kami.) Sometimes the adjective chin, ‘true,’ is prefixed in Chinese. See Shangti and Shinto.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb Slang To climb a mast, tree, rope, or the like, by embracing it alternately with the arms and legs, without help of steps, spurs, or the like; -- used with up.
  • intransitive verb Slang, U.S. To run about borrowing money hastily and temporarily, as for the payment of one's notes at the bank.
  • noun The front part of the leg below the knee; the front edge of the shin bone; the lower part of the leg; the shank.
  • noun (Railbroad) A fish plate for rails.
  • noun (Anat.) the tibia.
  • noun (Bot.) a perennial ericaceous herb (Pyrola elliptica) with a cluster of radical leaves and a raceme of greenish white flowers.
  • transitive verb Slang To climb (a pole, etc.) by shinning up.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The front part of the leg below the knee; the front edge of the shin bone; the lower part of the leg; the shank.
  • verb UK To climb a mast, tree, rope, or the like, by embracing it alternately with the arms and legs, without help of steps, spurs, or the like; -- used with up.
  • verb To strike with the shin.
  • noun The twenty-first letter of many Semitic alphabets/abjads (Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic and others).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb climb awkwardly, as if by scrambling
  • noun the inner and thicker of the two bones of the human leg between the knee and ankle
  • noun the 22nd letter of the Hebrew alphabet
  • noun the front part of the human leg between the knee and the ankle
  • noun a cut of meat from the lower part of the leg

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Hebrew šîn, of Phoenician origin; see šnn in Semitic roots.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English shine, from Old English scinu; see skei- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Ultimately from Proto-Semitic *śamš- (“sun”). Compare Shamash.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English scinu, from Proto-Germanic *skinō.

Examples

Comments

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  • Just for fun

    July 2, 2010

  • "In entomology, the tibia, or fourth joint of the leg. Also called shank. See cut under coxa."

    --Cent. Dict.

    December 18, 2012