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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The rubbing or kneading of parts of the body especially to aid circulation, relax the muscles, or provide sensual stimulation.
  • n. An act or instance of such rubbing or kneading.
  • transitive v. To give a massage to.
  • transitive v. To treat by means of a massage.
  • transitive v. To coddle or cajole.
  • transitive v. To manipulate (data, for example): Pollsters massaged the numbers to favor their candidate.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The action of rubbing, kneading or hitting someone's body, to help the person relax, prepare for muscular action (as in contact sports) or to relieve aches.
  • v. To rub and knead (someone's body or a part of a body), to perform a massage on (somebody).
  • v. To manipulate (data, a document etc.) to make it more presentable or more convenient to work with.
  • v. To falsify (data or accounts).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A rubbing or kneading of the body, especially when performed as a hygienic or remedial measure.
  • transitive v. To treat by means of massage; to rub or knead.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An obsolete form of message.
  • n. In therapeutics, the act or art of applying intermittent pressure and strain to the muscles and other accessible tissues of the patient.
  • In medicine, to treat by the process called massage.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. manually manipulate (someone's body), usually for medicinal or relaxation purposes
  • n. kneading and rubbing parts of the body to increase circulation and promote relaxation
  • v. give a massage to

Etymologies

French, from masser, to massage, from Arabic masaḥa, to stroke, anoint; see mšḥ in Semitic roots or massa, to touch; see mšš in Semitic roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French massage, from masser ("to massage") + -age. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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