Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The quality or state of being pertinacious: "Again and again ... with the inexorable pertinacity of a child ... did he renew his efforts” ( Nathaniel Hawthorne).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or characteristic of being pertinacious.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The quality or state of being pertinacious; obstinacy; perseverance; persistency.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The character of being pertinacious; resoulute or unyieding adherence, as to an opinion, purpose, design, course of action, etc.; persistency; obstinacy; resoluteness: as, to cling with pertinacity to one's purpose.
  • n. Synonyms See pertinacious.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. persistent determination

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The forward cylinder was depending on that unknown force men call the pertinacity of materials, which now and then balances that other heartbreaking power, the perversity of inanimate things.

    The Day's Work - Volume 1

  • Certainly, if the confederates of this roving gipsy were so pertinacious in tormenting poor weak Mr. Mompesson, their pertinacity is a most extraordinary instance of what revenge is capable of.

    Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions — Volume 2

  • Under the seal of confession he had been intrusted with a secret to which in his conversations with me he could make only indirect allusions, to bring me to understand that my pertinacity was a crime, and that the only honourable course was to yield.

    Mauprat

  • He stuck to his original proposition with that dogged but convenient pertinacity which is armed against all conviction, and deaf to all reasoning.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • She had the kind of pertinacity that sever admits being out of depth, the happy buoyancy that does not require to feel the bottom under one's feet.

    The Dwelling Place of Light — Complete

  • I object to something which is conceited and small-minded; but which also has that kind of pertinacity which always belongs to lunatics.

    The Appetite of Tyranny Including Letters to an Old Garibaldian

  • Being an honest man himself, he probably believes in the honesty of his friends, and supports them with a certain pertinacity which is a characteristic quality of his, better perhaps in the conqueror of the South than the President of the nation ....

    Further Records, 1848-1883: A Series of Letters

  • The heavy jaw and square-cut chin demonstrated rugged pertinacity and indomitability.

    TO THE MAN ON THE TRAIL

  • I imagine I had more pertinacity than the average Folk, or else I should not have succeeded.

    CHAPTER VIII

  • These unknown quantities were pluck, pertinacity, fearlessness, imagination, and cunning; and when they found expression in some consistent and striking action, those about him were astounded.

    MAUKI

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • pert in a city

    November 21, 2013

  • Sionnach, I responded to this comment on your other comment on my profile. If in fact you haven't gone away yet, you might see it there. Hope tax season treats you kindly.

    March 9, 2008

  • Ya know, I'm in complete agreement with Stephen on this point. A good novel is a fine thing. But a little nutmeg goes a long, long way. if I want to read this book, presumably I have the option of buying it for myself. Being forcefed huge chunks of it whenever I log in to Wordie is not actually my idea of a good time.

    Yeah, I'm grumpy. It's tax preparation time. I'm going away until I can manage to be more civil. But c_b, please have mercy. oh, never mind. It's a free country.

    Grumpy.

    March 9, 2008

  • "'Sir,' said Stephen, 'I read novels with the utmost pertinacity. I look upon them—I look upon good novels—as a very valuable part of literature, conveying more exact and finely-distinguished knowledge of the human heart and mind than almost any other...'"
    --Patrick O'Brian, The Nutmeg of Consolation, 297

    March 9, 2008