Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The condition or property of being solid.
  • n. Soundness of mind, moral character, or finances.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or quality of being solid.
  • n. Moral firmness; validity; truth; certainty.
  • n. The solid contents of a body; volume; amount of inclosed space.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The state or quality of being solid; density; consistency, -- opposed to fluidity; compactness; fullness of matter, -- opposed to openness or hollowness; strength; soundness, -- opposed to weakness or instability; the primary quality or affection of matter by which its particles exclude or resist all others; hardness; massiveness.
  • n. Moral firmness; soundness; strength; validity; truth; certainty; -- as opposed to weakness or fallaciousness.
  • n. The solid contents of a body; volume; amount of inclosed space.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or property of being solid.
  • n. The absolute impenetrability attributed by some metaphysicians to matter.
  • n. Fullness of matter: opposed to hollowness.
  • n. Massiveness; substantiality; hence, strength; stability.
  • n. Strength and firmness in general; soundness; strength; validity; truth; certainty.
  • n. In geometry, the quantity of space occupied by a solid body.
  • n. A solid body or mass.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the consistency of a solid
  • n. the quality of being solid and reliable financially or factually or morally
  • n. state of having the interior filled with matter

Etymologies

From Latin soliditās (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Only I have thought the term solidity the more proper to express this idea, not only because of its vulgar use in that sense, but also because it carries something more of positive in it than impenetrability; which is negative, and is perhaps more a consequence of solidity, than solidity itself.

    An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

  • The result of not being able to appreciate this, is that the finiteness of our sense, caused by its dependence on Motion for excitation, surrounds us with illusions; one of these illusions is what we call solidity or continuity of sensation.

    Science and the Infinite or Through a Window in the Blank Wall

  • But one reason for that solidity is that the General has something of a weight problem.

    Just In: 2011 Chevrolet Cruze

  • But you also get the sense that this solidity is like a sheen of oil floating on water; an acre wide and an atom deep, and beneath that surface there is nothing he really cares about more than himself.

    November 2004

  • And since the arrival of Robbie's letter there had come a certain solidity and reality to that visionary bond.

    Kirsteen: The Story of a Scotch Family Seventy Years Ago

  • Lady Clara Augusta Mandeville, then, was a widow of some three or four-and-thirty, an age fatal to all mere prettiness, but an age at which all women of sterling beauty are in the full-blown radiance of their charms; their mind, too, if it possess any solidity, is then in full maturity; there is a glow of summer richness, which yet does not touch on autumn.

    Zoe: The History of Two Lives

  • When the idea of solidity is excited a part of the extensive organ of touch is compressed by some external body, and this part of the sensorium so compressed exactly resembles in figure the figure of the body that compressed it.

    Canto III

  • The impressions, which enter by the sight and hearing, the smell and taste, are affirmed by modern philosophy to be without any resembling objects; and consequently the idea of solidity, which is supposed to be real, can never be derived from any of these senses.

    A Treatise of Human Nature

  • The impressions, which enter by the sight and hearing, the smell and taste, are affirm'd by modern philosophy to be without any resembling objects; and consequently the idea of solidity, which is suppos'd to be real, can never be deriv'd from any of these senses.

    A treatise of human nature

  • Hackett was selling long-term solidity, not short-term thrill.

    Independent.ie - Frontpage RSS Feed

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