Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun One of the divisions of a poem, composed of two or more lines usually characterized by a common pattern of meter, rhyme, and number of lines.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Pl. stanze (-ze). In architecture, an apartment or division in a building; a room or chamber: as, the stanze of Raphael in the Vatican.
  • noun In versification, a series of lines arranged in a fixed order of sequence as regards their length, metrical form, or rimes, and constituting a typical group, or one of a number of similar groups, composing a poem or part of a poem.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A number of lines or verses forming a division of a song or poem, and agreeing in meter, rhyme, number of lines, etc., with other divisions; a part of a poem, ordinarily containing every variation of measure in that poem; a combination or arrangement of lines usually recurring, whether like or unlike, in measure.
  • noun (Arch.) An apartment or division in a building; a room or chamber.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A unit of a poem, written or printed as a paragraph; equivalent to a verse.
  • noun architecture An apartment or division in a building.
  • noun computing A structural element in XML

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Italian; see stance.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Italian stanza.

Examples

  • This stanza is the only one that, in both the letter text and the broadside version of Shelley's poem, replicates the idea of an entire stanza of The Devil's Thoughts by R. Southey and S.T. Coleridge (1799), which reads in a note to J.

    Annotations

  • This stanza is the only one that, in both the letter text and the broadside version of Shelley's poem, replicates the idea of an entire stanza of The Devil's Thoughts by R. Southey and S.T. Coleridge (1799), which reads in a note to J.

    Annotations

  • I missed the one where I had to select a stanza from the national anthem.

    Mexican citizenship test--fun!

  • I missed the one where I had to select a stanza from the national anthem.

    Mexican citizenship test--fun!

  • I missed the one where I had to select a stanza from the national anthem.

    Mexican citizenship test--fun!

  • I missed the one where I had to select a stanza from the national anthem.

    Mexican citizenship test--fun!

  • I missed the one where I had to select a stanza from the national anthem.

    Mexican citizenship test--fun!

  • I missed the one where I had to select a stanza from the national anthem.

    Mexican citizenship test--fun!

  • I missed the one where I had to select a stanza from the national anthem.

    Mexican citizenship test--fun!

  • I missed the one where I had to select a stanza from the national anthem.

    Mexican citizenship test--fun!

Comments

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  • In North American sports reporting, any of the regulation periods of a game:

    "Salo's goal staved off a catastrophe for the home team, who allowed the Blackhawks to tie the game 3-3 after three goals in the first 14:31 of the final stanza."

    - Canucks narrowly avert disaster, The Globe and Mail, May 1, 2009

    May 2, 2009

  • Is this hockey specific? It might also be used in basketball, but that would be the only other possible sport I would think.

    May 2, 2009

  • It could be hockey-specific. Football? Nah. You're probly right there.

    May 2, 2009