Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun One who is enrolled or attends classes at a school, college, or university.
  • noun One who studies something.
  • noun An attentive observer.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A studious person; one who practises studying or investigation; one given to the study of books or the acquisition of knowledge: as, a student of science or of nature.
  • noun A person who is engaged in a course of study, either general or special; one who studies, especially with a view to education of a higher kind; an advanced scholar or pupil: as, an academical or college student; a student of theology, law, medicine, or art.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A person engaged in study; one who is devoted to learning; a learner; a pupil; a scholar; especially, one who attends a school, or who seeks knowledge from professional teachers or from books
  • noun One who studies or examines in any manner; an attentive and systematic observer.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A person who studies a particular academic subject.
  • noun figuratively A person seriously devoted to some subject, whether academic or not.
  • noun A person enrolled at a university.
  • noun A schoolchild.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a learner who is enrolled in an educational institution
  • noun a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, alteration (influenced by Latin studēre, to study) of studient, studiant, from Old French estudiant, one who studies, from present participle of estudier, to study, from Medieval Latin studiāre, from Latin studium, study; see study.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin studens, present participle of studere ("to study").

Examples

  • If I reason, Every student who can concentrate his attention can learn quickly, George Marston has a notable power of concentration, Therefore George Marston can learn quickly, I again break up the abstraction _student_, and the concrete fact

    The Making of Arguments

  • Here he rubbed shoulders with the future leaders of the Third Reich, including Heinrich Himmler, then an agronomy student active in the fraternities, a breeding ground for the budding ­student nationalist movement.

    Life and style | guardian.co.uk

  • This achieves similar results, except saying hello to each student in the @student array.

    Rails Wiki

  • The term student-athlete meant something to Shannon.

    Tom Gerdy: The Death of the Student Athlete

  • It seems that Randy Shannon lost his job because he believed too much in the term student-athlete.

    Tom Gerdy: The Death of the Student Athlete

  • A well-trained, prize-winning violin student is fascinated by a girl who follows her passion.

    Fruits Basket Followups: Banquet, Songs to Make You Smile » Manga Worth Reading

  • The term student-athlete meant something to Shannon.

    Tom Gerdy: The Death of the Student Athlete

  • It seems that Randy Shannon lost his job because he believed too much in the term student-athlete.

    Tom Gerdy: The Death of the Student Athlete

  • Taking the idea of Donald Trump's "The Apprentice," Cynthia Newsome has designed a challenge for her students: Do the best job promoting the Big Brothers Big Sisters program and attract the most college student volunteers to sign up to mentor the 300 at-risk children waiting in the Kansas City area and earn the title "student apprentice."

    Kansas City Star: Front Page

  • Cecil Newton wouldn't have tried to sell his kid's skills if there wasn't a market for it, and the chronic academic underachievement at some programs makes the term student-athlete'' an oxymoron on their campuses.

    StarTribune.com rss feed

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