Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A distinct group within a group; a subdivision of a group.
  • noun A subordinate group.
  • noun Mathematics A group that is a subset of a group.
  • transitive verb To divide into subgroups.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Any subordinate group in classification; a subdivision of a group; especially, a division the name of which begins with sub-, as subfamily or subgenus.
  • noun A mathematical group forming part of another group.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Biol.) A subdivision of a group, as of animals.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A group within a larger group; a group whose members are some, but not all, of the members of a larger group.
  • noun group theory A subset H of a group G that is itself a group and has the same binary operation as G.
  • verb To divide or classify into subgroups

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun (mathematics) a subset (that is not empty) of a mathematical group
  • noun a distinct and often subordinate group within a group

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

sub- +‎ group

Examples

  • So the minimum number required to count a subgroup is a GOOD feature of the law, and if anything, that number is too low in most cases.

    Think Progress » Leaving minorities behind.

  • Drawing on exit polls, he infers that this subgroup is likely two-thirds Latino and concludes that, as such, the apparent shift to Republicans is the "most implausible result" in the Gallup Poll.

    Gallup's Frank Newport Responds To Criticism

  • Drawing on exit polls, he infers that this subgroup is likely two-thirds Latino and concludes that, as such, the apparent shift to Republicans is the "most implausible result" in the Gallup Poll.

    Gallup's Frank Newport Responds To Criticism

  • Drawing on exit polls, he infers that this subgroup is likely two-thirds Latino and concludes that, as such, the apparent shift to Republicans is the "most implausible result" in the Gallup Poll.

    Gallup's Frank Newport Responds To Criticism

  • Drawing on exit polls, he infers that this subgroup is likely two-thirds Latino and concludes that, as such, the apparent shift to Republicans is the "most implausible result" in the Gallup Poll.

    Gallup's Frank Newport Responds To Criticism

  • Drawing on exit polls, he infers that this subgroup is likely two-thirds Latino and concludes that, as such, the apparent shift to Republicans is the "most implausible result" in the Gallup Poll.

    Gallup's Frank Newport Responds To Criticism

  • Drawing on exit polls, he infers that this subgroup is likely two-thirds Latino and concludes that, as such, the apparent shift to Republicans is the "most implausible result" in the Gallup Poll.

    Gallup's Frank Newport Responds To Criticism

  • The problem with my subgroup is that I don't think this 'shutdown' will ever be possible.

    Colonel Candid with the Dagger in the Conference Room

  • Then you cannot have one group bringing the scores up to passing when a subgroup is “left behind”

    Think Progress » Leaving minorities behind.

  • Whatever a federal grand jury investigating the case decides, a small political subgroup is experiencing the odd sensation that this leak has sprung before.

    08/06/2005

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